Advancing the Field

At the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, we are defining the new face of computing in education, research and outreach, as well as shaping computing's role in the world. Here’s how we’re doing it:

  1. Transforming undergraduate education with an innovative curriculum that provides lifelong, relevant skills and knowledge focused on combining student interests and real-world needs.
  2. Engaging in research with real-world impact that is measurable and sustainable. 
  3. Ignoring disciplinary boundaries and placing high value on cross collaboration (something not all universities do).
  4. Evolving the actual face of computing as we work to recruit more women and underrepresented minorities to the field. Our discipline will not be fully successful without diversity of thought and talent.

College of Computing Impact on the Field

Emerging Cyber Threats Report
Cyber threats cannot be adequately thwarted unless they are fully understood. The Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) is dedicated to thoroughly researching, analyzing and understanding the motives and methods of cyber attackers, and sharing that information with the community at large. In the 2012 Emerging Cyber Threats Report, GTISC draws upon a wide range of security research to uncover and explain the top three trends that will impact the security landscape in 2012: (1) the further proliferation and sophistication of botnets; (2) attacks on pervasive devices and social networking; and (3) the impact of cyber security issues on physical systems. Read more...
FutureMedia Outlook
Digital, social, mobile and multimedia are fundamentally changing business models and transforming how we communicate, both as organizations and as individuals. FutureMedia explores and enables new paradigms in how content is created, distributed and consumed. It is a global, open-innovation, collaborative initiative focused on creating, discovering, commercializing and shaping the future of media. The FutureMedia Outlook is an interactive, multimedia publication that presents Georgia Tech’s views on trends that will fundamentally transform how content is created, distributed and consumed in coming years. Read more...
Computing for Good
In the field, computing has the ability to advance the human condition. In the classroom, "computing for good" has the ability to enhance the learning experiences and enrich the lives of tomorrow's technology leaders. Computing for Good centers on the concept of applying computing to social causes and improving quality of life. It draws on the self-focused and altruistic sides of students by presenting computer science as a cutting-edge discipline that empowers them to solve problems of personal interest as well as problems important to society at large. Read more...
From Internet to Robotics
While the European Union, Japan, Korea, and the rest of the world have made significant R&D investments in robotics technology, the U.S. investment, outside unmanned systems for defense purposes, remains practically nonexistent. In 2008-2009, a dozen world-class robotics researchers from around the country—led by the College of Computing’s Henrik Christensen, KUKA Chair of Robotics—led an effort to produce a comprehensive “roadmap” that would the identify future impact of robotics technology on U.S. economic, social, and security needs, and document a strategy for addressing that impact. This joint committee of the Computing Research Association and the Computing Community Consortium presented its report to the U.S. Congress in July 2009. Read more...
Georgia Computes! Georgia Computes is a National Science Foundation Broadening Participation in Computing alliance focused on increasing the number and diversity of computing students in the state of Georgia, thus helping improve the computer science education pipeline. Through partnerships, workshops, camps, role model development and other activities, Georgia Computes impacts the pipeline at all levels: K-12, college and graduate school. Georgia Computes is one of the most successful BPC programs in the country. Read more...
Godel's Lost Letter Dr. Richard Lipton is a College of Computing distinguished professor of computing and a seminal figure in computer science history.  For more than 30 years, Dick Lipton has been producing some of what the Association for Computing Machinery calls "the most influential work in the field." He is most known for his work in complexity theory, program testing and software engineering, cryptography, and DNA computing—of which he is generally acknowledged to be a pioneer. Gödel’s Lost Letter is his blog named after the famous letter that Gödel wrote to von Neumann essentially stating the P=NP question decades before Cook and Karp. It explores the famous problem and other questions in the theory of computing. Read more...
Computing at the Margins Computing at the Margins is an emerging research agenda in the School of Interactive Computing aimed at understanding the unique technology needs of under-served communities, creating innovative technological solutions that serve and empower these communities, and advancing the field of computing to more ably address the digital divide. Economic factors such as cost of access and other aspects like cultural norms and values, disabilities, educational disadvantage (including literacy problems), racial discrimination, and the lack of reliable infrastructure all conspire to prevent "mainstream" computing tools from benefiting a broader spectrum of the population. Very often what is needed by these communities is not merely cheaper versions of the same technology, but a fundamentally different approach. Read more...
Scribbler Innovation in undergraduate computer science education is a hands on experience in the Institute for Personal Robots in Education (IPRE). IPRE was created to make computer science education more fun and effective through the use of personal robots as a context for teaching foundational computing skills. Students in the college’s Intro to Computer Science class can choose the traditional curriculum or the robot curriculum. The IPRE team is rigorously assessing the effectiveness of the approach and publishing results of the research through regular academic channels. IPRE is a joint effort between Georgia Tech and Bryn Mawr College, with initial sponsorship by Microsoft Research. Read more...
Threads The Georgia Tech College of Computing has released a report exploring the need for a new approach to undergraduate computing education in the face of an increasingly competitive global environment and describing the College’s new undergraduate computing program: Threads. The report presents the problem faced by computer science undergraduates, departments and colleges of computing, and relevant industry, and the innovative solution developed at Georgia Tech.  The report argues that tomorrow’s undergraduate computer science students will need to develop new skills to compete successfully in the future environment, and the idea of symphonic-thinking is of central importance to the tremendous opportunities and challenges faced by U.S. computer science graduates. Read more...

computing