PhD CS – Intelligent Systems Body of Knowledge

Cognitive Science Reading List

  • Anderson, J. R. (1993). Rules of the Mind
  • Barsalou, L. W. (1999). Perceptual Symbol Systems. Behavior and Brain Sciences.
  • Dunbar, K. (1995). How scientists really reason: Scientific reasoning in real-world laboratories. In R. J. Sternberg & J. E. Davidson (Eds.), The Nature of Insight (pp. 365-395). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
  • Ferguson, R. W. (2000). Modeling orientation effects in symmetry detection: The role of visual structure, Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 143). Hillsdale, New Jersey: Erlbaum.
  • Fodor, J. A. (1983). Modularity of Mind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Forbus, K. D., Gentner, D., & Law, K. (1995). MAC/FAC: A model of similarity-based retrieval. Cognitive Science, 19(2), 144-206.
  • Gentner, D. (1989). The mechanisms of analogical learning. In S. Vosniadou & A. Ortony (Eds.), Similarity and Analogical Reasoning (pp. 199-241). London: Cambridge University Press.
  • Goel, A., K. Mahesh, J. Peterson and K. Eiselt (1996). Unification of Language Understanding, Device Comprehension and Knowledge Acquisition. In Proc. 1996 Cognitive Science Conference, San Diego.
  • Goldmeier, E. (1936/1972). Similarity in visually perceived forms. Psychological Issues, 8(1), 14-133.
  • Haugeland, J. (1997). Mind Design II: Philosophy, Psychology, Artificial Intelligence. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, Chapters by Turing, Dennett, Newell and Simon, Searle, Rumelhart, Smolensky, Clark, Brooks.
  • Holyoak, K. J., & Thagard, P. (1989). Analogical mapping by constraint satisfaction. Cognitive Science, 13, 295-355.
  • Hutchins, E. (1995) How the cockpit remembers its speed. Cognitive Science, 19:265--288.
  • Kolodner, J. L. (1997). Educational implications of analogy: A view from case-based reasoning. American Psychologist, 52(1), 57-66.
  • Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1980). Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Larkin, J. H. (1987). Why a diagram is (sometimes) worth ten thousand words. Cognitive Science, 11, 65-99.
  • Markman, A. B. (1999). Knowledge Representation. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Nersessian, N. J. (1985). Faraday's field concept. In D. Gooding & F. James (Eds.), Faraday Rediscovered (pp. 175-188). New York: Stockton.
  • Nersessian, N. J. (1991). How do scientists think? Capturing the dynamics of conceptual change in science. In R. N. Giere (Ed.), Cognitive Models of Science (pp. 3-44). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Ram, A. (1993). Creative conceptual change. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
  • Schank, R. C. (1982). Dynamic Memory: A Theory of Reminding and Learning in Computers and People. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • R. Schank & H. Abelson (1977). Scripts, Plans, Goals and Understanding. Chapters 1-3.
  • Tomasello, M. (2000). The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition. Harvard University Press. Online version.
  • Tversky, A. (1977). Features of similarity. Psychological Review, 84(4), 327-352.