Multi-messenger Astrophysics: Challenges and Opportunities in Big data and Computing

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Date:
July 14, 2014 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Location:
Klaus Room 1116 West

AGENDA

1:30-2:00 coffee

2:00-3:00 Ed Seidel’s talk title "Computing and Data Challenges for Multi-Messenger Astronomy”

3:00-3:15 Bread for bagels

3:15-4:00 Panel Discussion “Big Data and the National Data Service”

Panelists: Gab Allen, David Bader, Ed Seidel, John Wise and Srinivas Aluru

 

TALK INFORMATION

SPEAKER:  H. Edward Seidel, NCSA director

TITLE:  Computing and Data Challenges for Multi-Messenger Astronomy

ABSTRACT:  Multi-messenger astronomy, that is, the ability to view and understand the universe though multiple "messengers" (e.g., gravitational waves, electromagnetic (including optical, infrared and radio), neutrinos, and cosmic rays), along with models and simulations will bring a revolution in our understanding of the universe and its constituents.  Each one of these fields is itself undergoing a revolution. In isolation, each may lead to Nobel Prize caliber discoveries in the coming decade; combining them for comprehensive understanding of great mysteries is where the true Grand Challenges of the Universe lie --- to answer fundamental questions such as what is a gamma-ray burst, or what is dark energy. I will describe basic concepts of multi-messenger approaches to astronomical observation and simulation, and describe the tremendous computing challenges these approaches bring.

 

BIO:  NCSA director H. Edward Seidel is a distinguished researcher in high-performance computing and relativity and astrophysics with an outstanding track record as a researcher and administrator. In addition to leading NCSA, he is also a Founder Professor in the University of Illinois Department of Physics and a professor in the Department of Astronomy.

His previous leadership roles include serving as the senior vice president of research and innovation at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Moscow, directing the Office of Cyberinfrastructure and serving as assistant director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation, and leading the Center for Computation & Technology at Louisiana State University.

Seidel is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. His research has been recognized by a number of awards, including the 2006 IEEE Sidney Fernbach Award.

He earned a master’s degree in physics at the University of Pennsylvania in 1983 and a doctorate in relativistic astrophysics at Yale University in 1988.

 

PANEL INFORMATION

PANELISTS:  Gab Allen, David Bader, Ed Seidel, John Wise and Srinivas Aluru

TITLE:  Big Data and National Data Center Panel

DESCRIPTION:  a  discussion about opportunities for partnering on multi-messenger astronomy and other drivers of big data and high performance computing, including their impact on a National Data Service.

 

PANEL BIOS:

Gabrielle Allen

Gabrielle Allen is a  full professor of Astronomy at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the Associate Director for Computational Research and Education Programs at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.  She received her Ph.D.  in computational astrophysics from Cardiff University in 1993.

David Bader

David A. Bader is a Full Professor and Chair of the School of Computational Science and Engineering, College of Computing, at Georgia Institute of Technology, and Executive Director of High Performance Computing. He received his Ph.D. in 1996 from The University of Maryland, and his research is supported through highly-competitive research awards, primarily from NSF, NIH, DARPA, and DOE

Ed Seidel

NCSA director H. Edward Seidel is a distinguished researcher in high-performance computing and relativity and astrophysics with an outstanding track record as a researcher and administrator. In addition to leading NCSA, he is also a Founder Professor in the University of Illinois Department of Physics and a professor in the Department of Astronomy.

John Wise

John Wise is an assistant professor in the School of Physics at Georgia Institute of Technology.  He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 2007.  His research is in computational cosmology including high performance computing to understanding the first stars and galaxies.

Srinivas Aluru

Srinivas Aluru is a professor in the School of Computational Science and Engineering within the College of Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology. He conducts research in high performance computing, bioinformatics and systems biology, combinatorial scientific computing, and applied algorithms.