Babysitting robots, once the province of futuristic fiction, are on the market. They make conversation, recognize faces and keep track of kids. But some researchers worry kids could be harmed. Roboticist Ronald Arkin says, "This stuff absolutely warrants further study." Source: Wired

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Assistant Professor Nick Feamster has been recognized as one of the nation’s top young scientists with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The ceremony was held today at the White House. Source: Georgia Tech Communications and Marketing

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Georgia Tech’s Center for Manycore Computing has been named one of “10 really cool university networking labs.” Director Tom Conte says, “We're shrinking the technology that made the Internet possible and implementing it inside a single microchip.” Source: Network World

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Computer Science Assistant Professor Jonathon Giffin says the greatest danger to Internet security today are bots and botnets, which have infiltrated up to 15 percent of all computers linked to the Internet. The worst part? It's difficult for individual computer users to protect themselves. Source: Minnesota Public Radio

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The Georgia Tech Information Security Center estimates that 15 percent of online computers worldwide are part of botnets: millions of computers infected with malicious code that lets attackers turn them into "zombies" for their own evil electronic deeds. That's up from 10 percent a year ago. Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

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A course called Computing for Good gave two Ph.D. candidates the opportunity to solve a life-or-death problem: monitoring the safety of blood supplies in African nations ravaged by HIV and AIDS. Source: Network World

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Ali Suleman, who graduated in 2003 with a bachelor’s in computer science, founded a company last year called Esgut—a portfolio of Facebook applications—that became a genuine viral hit. In April, he sold the company to the Social Gaming Network for seven figures. Source: cnn.com

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ATLANTA – December 9, 2008 – The Georgia Tech College of Computing, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has developed a Web-based tool for tracking blood safety. The tool is expected to help developing countries improve the adequacy and safety of their national blood supplies through better monitoring and evaluation. Source: Office of Communications

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Atlanta (December 9, 2008) —If you write a blog and haven’t been to Skribit (skribit.com) perhaps it’s just a matter of time. Paul Stamatiou created the service as a tool to help cure blogger’s block (writer’s block for bloggers) a little over a year ago, and already it gets about 4 million hits per month from the more than 4,000 blogs using it. Source: GT Communications and Marketing

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Researchers at the Georgia Tech Information Security Center reported that the percentage of online computers worldwide infected by botnets is likely to increase to 15 percent by the end of this year, from 10 percent in 2007. Source: New York Times

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A Marietta artist and others with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, are testing a helper robot developed by robotics researcher Charles Kemp. Source: CNN

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Professor Ron C. Arkin says it’s time to focus on aspects other the efficiency and safety of soldier robots, such as programming them to comply with the Laws of War and the Rules of Engagement. Source: The Takeaway

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Computing Professor Ronald C. Arkin, who designs software for battlefield robots, says that “intelligent robots can behave more ethically in the battlefield than humans currently can.” Source: New York Times

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U.S. News & World Report ranked Georgia Tech 8th in the world for engineering and information technology programs. Source: U.S. News and World Report

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The Georgia Tech Colleges of Computing and Engineering are embarking on a joint research effort that will include the creation of the Georgia Tech Center for Manycore Computing, a research center for innovations in computer architecture. Source: Dr. Dobb’s Portal

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Associate professor Ayanna Howard of the Robotics and Intelligent Machines Center helped build robots that someday will gather weather and climate data from remote parts of the Arctic and Antarctic that are too dangerous for scientists to traverse. Source: USA Today

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Virginia Tech's text-message alert system failed when the sound of gunfire was heard on campus last week. Patrick Traynor, computer science assistant professor, said text-alert systems that use current cellular networks can overwhelm the system and cause partial or complete failure. Source: eSchool News

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The average disabled American pays $16,000 for a properly trained service dog and waits years for one, says Charlie Kemp, an adjunct professor in the School of Interactive Computing. But robots now in development could soon be available commercially for $5,000. Source: Health.com

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In its "Emerging Cyber Threats Report for 2009," the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) named five trends that will drive threats and countermeasures in the coming year: malware, botnets, cyberwarfare, threats to VoIP and mobile devices and the evolving cybercrime economy. Source: Networkworld

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AUSTIN, Texas (SC08) – November 18, 2008 – The Georgia Institute of Technology, a national leader in high-performance computing research and education, announced plans to create the Georgia Tech Center for Manycore Computing, a joint research center of the Colleges of Computing and Engineering that will pursue innovations in computer architecture. Source: Office of Communications

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AUSTIN, Texas (SC08) – November 17, 2008 – Georgia Tech, a national leader in high performance computing research and education, announced the addition of six distinguished researchers to its current roster of experts and luminaries in supercomputing. Source: Office of Communications

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Robots that help disabled people the way service dogs do are expected to be available to the public within the next several years, and they would be cheaper and easier to get, says Professor Charlie Kemp of the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines. Source: Fox 5 Atlanta

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Interactive Computing Professor Melody Moore Jackson and Music Professor Parag Chordia are using brain imaging techniques to learn how the brain reacts during the creative process, especially improvisation by musicians. Source: Georgia Tech Communications and Marketing

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The same hackers who infiltrated computer systems of the White House and the McCain and Obama campaigns also threaten power grids, water systems, transportation, communications and the commercial sector, said Howard Schmidt, a professor at the Georgia Tech Information Security Center. Source: Investors Business Daily

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Interactive computing researchers have developed technology to help beginners learn to play piano. Piano touch is a light-weight glove, outfitted with electronics, that cues the musician with vibrations on each finger to tell him or her which one to use to play the next note. Source: Georgia Tech Communications and Marketing

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ATLANTA (November 11, 2008)—The Georgia Institute of Technology will command a significant presence at next week’s SC08, the international conference on high-performance computing, networking, storage and analysis being held Nov. 15-21 at the Austin Convention Center in Austin, Texas. Source: Office of Communications

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“As these devices have richer functionality, you’re going to be able to install applications, and we’re going to run into the same kind of problems” that laptops and desktops have, said Mustaque Ahamad, director of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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“If we rely solely on traditional science and technology methodologies, scientific problems are going to become more and more difficult to solve," says Professor Haesun Park of Computational Science and Engineering. Park heads up the Foundations of Data and Visual Analytics research initiative. Source: Genome Technology

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A team led by Adjunct Professor P.K. Yeung of Computational Science and Engineering is investigating fundamental problems of dispersion in turbulent fluid flow, which affect pollutant transport in both atmospheric and oceanic environments. Source: National Institute for Computational Sciences

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The Georgia Institute of Technology recently was listed among the top world universities in engineering and technology in two separate global rankings. Source: Georgia Tech Communications and Marketing

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Emerging cyber-threats like the botnets described in the recent Georgia Tech Information Security Center report underscore the need for more and better internet security tools. Source: The News & Observer

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Charlie Kemp, a biomedical engineering professor affiliated with the Georgia Tech Robotics and Intelligent Machines Center, is developing a robot that could offer the same kind of help as service animals. Source: EETimes

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A report released by the Georgia Institute of Technology's Information Security Center predicts that botnets will infiltrate the mobile space next year. Viruses, worms, Trojans and spyware are already targeting the mobile platform. Source: ZDNet.co.uk

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A security expert who attended the recent Security Summit on Emerging Cyber Security Threats sponsored by Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) says, “Data will continue to be the primary motive behind future cyber crime.” Source: Homeland Security Today

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Mustaque Ahamad, director of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC), says the large and fairly open computer systems at institutions of higher education could be hit especially hard by malware, botnets and viruses. Source: Campus Technology

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Charles Kemp, an assistant professor affiliated with the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines, believes that animal helpers may offer the ideal model for robotic assistants. Kemp and graduate student Hai Nguyen have studied helper monkeys and are now studying dog assistants. Source: MIT Technology Review

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The Foley Scholars Endowment has named Kelly Caine, a Ph.D. student in the School of Psychology, and Christopher Le Dantec, a Ph.D. student specializing in human-centered computing from the School of Interactive Computing, as the 2008-2009 Foley Scholars.

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Faculty at the Center for Experimental Research in Computer Systems want students to be exposed to multi-threading and parallel computing early and often. Research scientist Matthew Wolf says, “It’s something students should be learning in the course of everything else they’re doing.” Source: Intel Software Insight

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Spam may soon spill out beyond your inbox and start slithering onto your cellphone, warns a new report from the Georgia Tech Information Security Center. Source: PC World

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Malware and botnets are among the top security concerns online for 2009, according a report released Wednesday at a summit hosted by the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC). Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Hackers can infect thousands of PCs with special viruses and lash the machines together into "botnets" to pump out spam or attack other computers. Cell phones may be the next target, says a new report by researchers at the College of Computing. Source: Associated Press

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ATLANTA (October 15, 2008) – The Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC), a national leader in information security research and education, today announced the release of the GTISC Emerging Cyber Threats Report for 2009, outlining the top five areas of security concern and risk for consumer and enterprise Internet users for the coming year. Source: Office of Communications

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A recent report identified 10 breakthroughs in U.S. computational science during the past year, and six of those involved science done with high-performance machines at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  “Breakthrough science - that's what it's all about," said Thomas Zacharia, ORNL's scientific computing leader and joint professor in Computational Science and Engineering. Source: Knoxville News Sentinel

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In the first month after the App Store debuted alongside the new iPhones on July 11, users downloaded more than 60 million of the programs. Interactive computing Professor Blair MacIntyre has downloaded dozens of apps to his own iPhone but points out that Apple hasn't exactly broken new ground. Source: TopTech News

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An annual "Turing Test" will start Sunday to see if computers can fool judges into believing the computer is human. If humans ever create a “conscious” robot, Henrik Christensen, director of the Center of Robotics and Intelligent Machines, said, “[the robots] would want to have rights, and they probably should." Source: Digitaljournal.com

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Paul Judge, who earned both a Master’s degree and a Ph.D. in computer science at the College, has been appointed Chairman of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) Industry Advisory Board. Source: MarketWatch

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Professor David Bader is working with a new processor architecture that can transform days or weeks of work by a cluster or supercomputer into a job that takes minutes or even seconds. Source: Genome Technology

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A paper by Ph.D. student Raul Santelices, former visiting researcher Pavan Kumar Chittimalli, alumnus Taweesup Apiwattanapong and Professors Alessandro (Alex) Orso and Mary Jean Harrold—all of the School of Computer Science—received a “Best Paper Award” and a “Distinguished Paper Award” at the 23rd IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering. Source: Office of Communications

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Mark Bodorovsky, Regents’ Professor of computational science and engineering and his team have developed a computer program that trains itself to predict genes in the DNA sequences of fungi. Source: Georgia Tech Research News

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How much governance should there be in open source software? Open source developers often argue for little or none and point to such “ungoverned” successes as Wikipedia. But grad student Andrea Forte and IC Associate Professor Amy Bruckman describe Wikipedia as an organization with highly refined policies, norms and a technological architecture. Source: Open Source Magazine

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When explaining AR technology, interactive computing Professor Blair MacIntyre often invokes the virtual first-down marker seen as a yellow stripe in televised football games. “The technical challenge of AR is to do something similar but more complex with the live video feed from a cell phone camera and without the 10-second delay.” Source: Scientific American

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Text-message alert systems may be ineffective in the event of large-scale emergencies, suggests a new report by Assistant Professor Patrick G. Traynor of the School of Computer Science. Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

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Exascale data centers, such as the ones Professor Karsten Schawn is working toward with help from HP Labs, would harness farms of petaflop-caliber computers to achieve 1,000-fold increases over the world's fastest computers. Source: EE Times

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Having crashed through the petaflop barrier of a thousand trillion calculations per second back in June, scientists including Computing Professor Karsten Schwan are working to achieve the next benchmark in supercomputer performance—exascale computing. Source: GizMag

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Universities and municipalities are buying text messaging or SMS services as a way to deliver critical information during disaster events, but computer science Assistant Professor Patrick Traynor says, “Unfortunately, such systems typically will not work as advertised.” Source: MarketWatch

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ATLANTA, GA. (September 17, 2008) - While most personal computers today can process a few hundred thousand calculations per second, computer scientists at the College of Computing are laying the groundwork for exascale machines that will process more than a million trillion – or 1018 – calculations per second. Source: Office of Communications

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Dr. Richard A. DeMillo, The John P. Imlay Jr. Dean of the College of Computing at Georgia Tech, has joined the Board of Directors of the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Foundation (JRCPF), the former president and first lady’s Atlanta-based foundation that provides grants and awards to recognize the best practices in campus-community partnership programs and the best new ideas for student-led community service projects to solve community based problems.

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Apple may not have invented the concept of the mobile application, but the company's ultra-hip iPhone takes it to a new level of convenience and ease-of-use, says Blair MacIntyre, associate professor in Interactive Computing. Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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The fire hose of data that is expected to result when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) begins smashing protons together this fall will challenge not only physics but computing as well. David Bader, executive director of high performance computing at Georgia Tech, said “The one thing that the Web hasn't been able to do is manage a phenomenal wealth of data.” Source: Scientific American

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Green building practices and many energy- and water-saving features helped the Christopher W. Klaus Advanced Computing Building (KACB) win a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification. Source: Southface Journal

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Experts trace the roots of Atlanta’s security business to Internet Security Systems, a company started in 1994 by former Tech students Christopher Klaus and Tom Noonan, and other companies germinated through the Georgia Tech Information Security Center have helped make the city a center for cyber-security startups. Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution

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Interim Dean Jim Foley gave the commencement address at the Summer 2008 Commencement before more than 500 graduates, their families and friends on August 1 at the Georgia World Congress Center. Click below to read the full text.

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Phil Gordon, who graduated in 1991 with a B.S. in Information and Computer Science and helped found a tech company that later sold for $95 million, now seeks to triumph in the world of professional card playing. Source: New York Times

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Researchers at the College of Computing are developing futuristic gadgets that can help blind people find their most-prized possessions with the click of a button and alert adult children if an elderly parent has fallen in his or her home and can't get up. Source: ABC News

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Computer science Professor Karsten Schwan has won an HP Labs Innovation Research Award, which fund strategic joint research projects between academic research institutions worldwide and HP Labs. The award provides project funding of up to $100,000 for one year and is renewable for a total of up to three years. Source: Hewlett-Packard Company

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During the summer session of Operation P.E.A.C.E., a community center in downtown Atlanta, kids chatted and networked, did learning assignments and played games using a single Internet portal created by College of Computing students as part of a class assignment. The course led some students to Africa to work on public health and policy issues. Source: ajc.com

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Engineers, scientists, philosophers, ethicists and lawyers are talking about the ethical implications of emerging technologies in scholarly journals, online discussions and conferences. “It’s a hot topic,” said Ronald Arkin, a College of Computing professor who advises the Army on robot weapons. “We need ... to be aware of the consequences of our research.” Source: New York Times

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Interactive computing Professor Blair Macintyre talks about the AR Second Life project that interfaces Second Life client code with augmented reality technologies. One of the project's experiments brings avatars out of the virtual world of Second Life and into the real world to interact with real people. Source: The Escapist

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The Institute for Personal Robots in Education (IPRE), a joint program of the College of Computing, Bryn Mawr College and Microsoft Research, has given out $250,000 in grants to help establish robotics-based curriculum at 28 high schools and universities. Source: Gizmag

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Don't block video files, FCC orders. It doesn't, company says, it merely delays some big-file deliveries to avert clog-ups. Good service, or discrimination? Computer Science Professor and Chair Ellen Zegura gives her take. Source: ajc.com

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Computer science Professor Jonathon Giffin hits the road with an assistant and a laptop to show there are thousands of open wireless access points that allow hackers to gain entry into someone else's network. Source: CNN

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In today's digital age, scientists and government agencies are experiencing what many can relate to: information overload. For help, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Science Foundation are turning to a group of scientists at the College of Computing to lead a nationwide research effort in data and visual analytics. Source: Cox News

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On June 26 the Office of the Provost announced that James D. Foley, professor in the School of Interactive Computing, will take over as interim dean of the College of Computing, effective July 1, 2008. Foley will work together with Rich DeMillo, the current John P. Imlay Jr. Dean of Computing, who announced in a June 12 letter that he will step down in November.

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ATLANTA (August 6, 2008)—Enormous amounts of data are being generated in health care, computational biology, homeland security and other areas, but analyzing these massive and unstructured data sets has proven cumbersome and difficult. An emerging research field known as data and visual analytics is helping sift through such mountains of information to find and put together individual pieces of a picture. Source: Office of Communications

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As scientists explore new ways to sift through huge troves of information and transform them into tidbits that researchers, health officials and even police officers can act on, Georgia Tech announced Wednesday it had received a $3 million grant aimed at establishing visual and data analytics as a distinct research field for the first time. Source: Associated Press (Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, The Canadian Press, cnbc.com, msnbc.com, red.orbit.com et al)

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ATLANTA (August 6, 2008)—Through the Institute for Personal Robots in Education (IPRE)—a partnership between Georgia Tech College of Computing, Bryn Mawr College and Microsoft Research—28 high schools and universities are being provided the opportunity to enhance their introductory Computer Science curriculum using personal robots as a context for teaching foundational computing skills. Winners will share $250,000 and receive paperback book-sized robots called Scribblers, enhanced with special IPRE hardware technology, along with the IPRE software and class text. Source: Office of Communications

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The Institute for Personal Robots in Education, a partnership between the Georgia Institute of Technology, Bryn Mawr College, and Microsoft Research, has awarded grants to 28 colleges and high schools throughout the country to use personal robots to teach basic computing skills. Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

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A first-of-its-kind flaw in the Internet's infrastructure makes it easy for hackers to divert users to fake Web sites where their personal information—passwords, e-mails, etc.—is vulnerable. "The range of potential abuses [is] disturbing and alarming," said College of Computing researcher David Dagon. Source: ABC News

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Andrea Thomaz, assistant professor in interactive computing, has been selected as an Office of Naval Research 2008 Young Investigator for her work to develop robots that are capable of social learning.

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GT/CMUnited’08, a team made up of members from Georgia Tech Computing and Carnegie Mellon University, placed second in their league at Robocup 2008, an international robotic soccer competition held July 14-20 in Suzhou, China.

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Grad student Susan Wyche and Professor Beki Grinter of the School of Interactive Computing compare how people in Nairobi and Atlanta use information technology and examine how religious behavior is influenced by new information technologies, and vice versa. Source: IEEE Spectrum online

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Interactive Computing Adjunct Professor Ayanna Howard, a member of NASA's Mars technology program team that developed an autonomous, next-generation Mars rover, believed that robotics could lead to new discoveries in the Arctic. The result? Snomotes. Source: SnoWest Magazine

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Professor Ayanna Howard of the Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM) Center led the team that built the SnoMote—a new remote control snowmobile funded by NASA to help scientists in polar regions collect climate data without venturing onto treacherous ice sheets. Source: Popular Science

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Three-time College of Computing graduate (Ph.D. 1997, M.S. 1992, and B.S. 1990) Annie Anton and Ph.D. candidate Erika Poole are among the most accomplished and influential women in technology and government, according to a prominent blogger who writes about politics and women. Source: The Political Voices of Women

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SIGGRAPH 2008 will offer a smorgasbord of art, education and commerce at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Aug. 11-15. “These presentations give us a glimpse into a future with highly realistic computer games, stunning feature film special effects, intelligent cameras, and rich photo manipulation tools,” said associate professor Greg Turk. Source: TVTechnology.com

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With financial help from Computing, the Savannah campus of Georgia Tech is hosting summer camps where elementary through high school students can learn to create original computer animations and games and build and program robots. Source: Effingham Herald

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Using computer modeling of how aquarium fish are affected by their environment helps middle school science teachers demonstrate how complex systems function, according to an article co-authored by interactive computing Associate Professor Ashok Goel, senior research scientist Spencer Rugaber and Ph.D. student Swaroop Vattam. Source: Science Scope

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Computational science and engineering Professor David Bader has been working with IBM on developing its PowerXCell processor, a supercomputing chip originally designed for the Playstation 3, to search for oil reserves in what is called “ultradeep water” – 5,000 feet or more deep. Source: Financial Times

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RICHLAND, Wash. (July 14, 2008) -- Georgia Tech is part of a multi-institutional collaboration that received $4 million from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop software for the newest generation of supercomputers. This was announced today by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

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Interactive Computing Associate Professor Ashwin Ram gives a Google Tech Talk about the application of case-based reasoning in game artificial intelligence. Source: Talk of the Car

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As researchers explore possible "replacements" for the Internet, Professor and Chair Ellen Zegura of Computer Science says streamlining network protocols may make networks easier to maintain, which would save colleges and industry a lot of money. Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

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Professor David Bader talked with National Public Radio about how the Cell Broadband Engine™ could give pilots an early warning of imminent structural failure in planes.

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Professor David Bader calls the Cell Broadband Engine™ “ahead of its time” and says the buzz surrounding the recent renewal of Georgia Tech’s Sony-Toshiba-IBM (STI) Center of Competence could help build consensus to standardize development environments for different Cell form factors. Source: HPC Wire

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Researchers at the College's Sony-Toshiba-IBM Center of Competence have developed seven new pilot projects using the Cell processor, the heart of the Sony PlayStation 3 game console, including a kind of early warning system to alert pilots to potentially catastrophic problems with the aircraft. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Austin American-Statesman

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ATLANTA (July 9, 2008) — The Georgia Tech College of Computing today announced the renewal of the Sony Group-Toshiba-IBM Center of Competence, based on Georgia Tech’s exceptional work in research for the Cell Broadband Engine™ technology. (Beyond3D Forum, Campus Technology, EDN, EETimes, Electronic News, Electronics Weekly, MarketWatch, PR-Inside.com, RTTNews, SuperComputingOnline.com, Tech-On!, TMCnet)

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Is a comic book in three dimensions still a comic book? That’s the question the people behind Embodied Comics—including Yanfeng Chen, who recently graduated with a master’s in human computer interaction—are asking with their interactive digital creation that lets “readers” physically participate in the action. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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Interactive Computing professor Blair MacIntyre and his team in the Augmented Environments Lab are working on technology that could someday let people use their mobile phones to play virtual tennis on a real table or turn ordinary objects into information-rich hyperlinks. Source: CNN.com

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College of Computing Dean Richard Demillo announced last week his resignation as of November 1 and his intention to return to the faculty as a professor. Provost and Interim President Gary Schuster named as the interim dean Interactive Computing Professor James Foley, effective July 1. Source: Technique

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A new lobbying group—InternetForEveryone.org—wants to make broadband access for all an issue in the upcoming general elections. “Broadband is where a lot of innovation is heading in the technology industry," Professor Beki Grinter says. Source: Tech News World

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Atlanta is the Southeast's largest cybercity and the nation's 10th largest by high-tech employment, according to a report published by the technology trade association AeA. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Interactive computing professor Ron Arkin says it’s unwise to discourage discussion about the potential for human-robot relationships. "It's gonna be here before we know it," he says. "If the questions aren't asked, the technology will just show up on your doorstep." Source: Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription Required)

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Security researchers work hard and fast to keep up with spammers, computer science grad student David Dagon says. “Antispam technology has become pretty mature in the last few years, but a lot of innovation still has to occur because the problem is so dynamic." Read the full article here. Source: Wall Street Journal

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The Christopher W. Klaus Advanced Computing Building (KACB), home to the College of Computing and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification.Visit the photo gallery.

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A robot designed by Charlie Kemp, a faculty member with the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines at the College of Computing, and other researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University is among a new generation of robots that show great promise for commercial and personal applications. Source: Electronic Design

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Computer security researchers have to work hard and fast to keep up with spammers, computer science grad student David Dagon says. “Antispam technology has become pretty mature in the last few years, but a lot of innovation still has to occur because the problem is so dynamic." Source: Wall Street Journal

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Barbara Ericson, director of computer science outreach at the College, has been named to the national College Board committee that helps guide and shape policies governing the use and direction of the Advanced Placement exam in computer science.

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Jeffrey Skolnick, an adjunct professor in the Computational Science and Engineering Division, led a Georgia Tech research team in creating a computerized method of analyzing cellular activity that correctly predicts the anti-tumor activity of several molecules. Read the research in Molecular Cancer. Source: UPI

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Interactive Computing Professor John Stasko was in Australia last week to brief law enforcement and intelligence officers about Jigsaw, a data-analysis prototype he helped develop that can make a big difference in crime and security investigations. Source: Australian IT

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Professor Ayanna Howard of the Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM) Center at Georgia Tech is in Juneau this week to test the prototype of an autonomous robot she developed that will help scientists monitor climate change in Antarctica. Source: The Capital City Weekly

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Computing Professor Ron Arkin is collaborating with faculty at the University of Pennsylvania to create robots that will work in concert like a swarm of ants or bees, creep like spiders or hover like hummingbirds. Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer

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College of Computing professors Bruce Walker and Frank Dellaert have developed a wearable system that tracks a blind person's position using GPS and emits sounds to alert them of obstacles such as fire hydrants or park benches. Source: Textiles 21

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Chuck Eastman, a professor in the College of Computing and the School of Architecture, has long championed a design tool called building-information modeling (BIM), a much more powerful approach to building design than the old-fashioned two-dimensional elevation and plan drawings. Source: The Economist

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Universities are typically on the leading edge of new technologies, and right now researchers at the GVU Center are working on something that may affect the way everyone consumes -- augmented reality. Source: Game Daily

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DialPrice, a free price-checking service that lets consumers use a simple phone to instantly compare prices on products at different stores, is one of the most popular widgets on Yahoo!’s mobile platform. It was developed by College of Computing students Roger Pincombe and Juan C. Villa during the Yahoo! Hackfest held here in March. Source: Yahoo! Research

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Gregory Abowd, Distinguished Professor in the School of Interactive Computing, has been named interim director of the Health Systems Institute (HSI) at Georgia Tech.

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Anind K. Dey, who earned a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the College of Computing, has received the National Science Foundation’s Faculty Early Career Development Award, the agency’s most prestigious award for junior faculty.

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Scientists are working hard to understand how and why the world’s ice shelves are melting, but gathering on-site data from volatile ice sheets is too dangerous for humans. Ayanna Howard, of the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines, led a project to create specially designed robots to traverse these potentially dangerous ice environments. Source: Eurekalert

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ATLANTA (May 28, 2008) –– Media Power Inc., a global developer of high technology products, today announced it is donating $5 million over the next five years to Georgia Tech's GVU Center for research and educational activities in Augmented Reality (AR) and mobile computing.

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ATLANTA (May 28, 2008) –– Media Power Inc., a global developer of high technology products, today announced it is donating $5 million over the next five years to Georgia Tech's GVU Center for research and educational activities in Augmented Reality (AR) and mobile computing.

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Shwetak Patel, a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Interactive Computing (SIC) took home the Best Paper Award from the Pervasive Computing 2008 conference, which was held May 19-22 in Sydney, Australia.

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Interactive Computing Professor Tucker Balch is co-chair of the RoboCup 2008 U.S. Open, a three-day event being held in Pittsburgh this week that aims to foster education and research in artificial intelligence and robotics by using soccer as a testing ground. Source: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

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Jim Foley, professor in the School of Interactive Computing, has been elected to a three-year term as vice president of SIGGRAPH (Special Interest Group on Graphics and Interactive Techniques), the largest special interest group of the Association for Computing Machinery.

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A two-day workshop for senior women in technology titled “Leadership: The Final Frontier” and sponsored by the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology will take place at the College of Computing June 30-July 1.

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Seventeen students from colleges around the country arrived at the College of Computing this week to take part in a summer research internship that will give them an opportunity to gain valuable research experience while getting acquainted with Georgia Tech.

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Metro Atlanta colleges are enrolling and graduating more students than most major metropolitan areas in the U.S., according to a new study. Atlanta's success comes from soaring population growth and the rising national prominence of such schools as Georgia Tech. Read the study here. Source: Associated Press

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Metro Atlanta colleges are enrolling students and turning out graduates at a faster pace than most major metropolitan areas in the country, according to a new study. That may be partly because two nearby universities–UGA and Georgia Tech–are ranked in the top 20 public universities in the country. Read the study here. Source: Associated Press

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As more people use their cellphones to check the time, the wristwatch moves closer to being primarily a fashion accessory. Daniel Ashbrook, a graduate research assistant in the School of Interactive Computing, is working on technology that could make the wristwatch a cool gadget once more. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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The British are embracing facial recognition technology to help raise compliance with certain laws, but Americans and others may not be as enthusiastic. "[In Great Britain] there's just a large use of cameras in support of crime reduction in general," said Aaron Bobick, chairman of the School of Interactive Computing. Source: ABC News

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Thad Starner, a pioneer and leader in the field of mobile computing and professor in the School of Interactive Computing, wears his computer wherever he goes. It comprises a hand-held nine-button keyboard, a battery pack slung over his shoulder, and a tiny monitor attached to his glasses an inch from his left eye. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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The concept of "smart clothes" may sound like something out of James Bond or "Minority Report," but the enabling technology already exists. Though not much is available commercially yet, you can see prototypes of wearable technology in the Contextual Computing Group lab at Georgia Tech, which is in the forefront of research in this area. Look at photos of "wearable" computers here. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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Robots will play greater roles in the lives of average people as scientists learn to instill robots with more intelligence. "The personal robot market is already growing 400% per year," says Henrik Christensen, director of Robotics and Intelligent Machines Center. Nexi--MIT Media Lab's new humanoid robot that can see, hear, and smile--is symbolic of the widespread research interest in future applications for personal robots. Source: Industry Week

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Shwetak Patel, a doctoral candidate in the School of Interactive Computing, has developed a device that can turn a home's ventilation system into a surveillance system by measuring minute changes in air pressure in the rooms. Patel says his approach is much cheaper than motion sensors, because it simply modifies existing systems. Source: New Scientist

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Frank Dellaert, associate professor at the School of Interactive Computing, Ph.D. student Grant Schindler and scientists at Microsoft Research are at work on “4D Cities,” a project to create an image database using decades' worth of photos to show a city's evolution as a kind of virtual time-lapse film. Source: Architect Magazine

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Upgrades to Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Jaguar supercomputer have more than doubled its performance, increasing the system's ability to deliver far-reaching advances in climate studies, energy research, and a wide range of sciences. "This is an important advancement," said Thomas Zacharia, part-time professor in the Computational Science and Engineering Division and ORNL associate laboratory director for computing and computational sciences. Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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As interactive websites for children proliferate, more and more kids and ‘tweens are developing alter egos to explore life in cyberworld. “Get used to it,” said interactive computing professor Amy Bruckman, who studies how children interact with computers. “Identity formation is a key part of what kids go through, and these sites offer that opportunity.” Source: The New York Times

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Kamesh Madduri won the best poster award in the Ph. D. Forum at the 22nd IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium (IPDPS) held April 14-18 in Miami. Madduri’s research in computational science and high-performance computing beat out 72 other submissions to win one of two prizes in the competition.

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Many of the vulnerabilities that have made e-mail security problem are spreading to voice-over-IP systems, raising the specter of a new generation of security threats. “There is no reason to believe the bad guys will not exploit this,” said Mustaque Ahamad, professor of computer science and director of Georgia Tech’s Information Security Center. Source: Government Computer News

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Ling Liu, associate professor in the School of Computer Science, spoke at Northwestern University recently about the work she and her colleagues are doing on location-based computing. “Everybody has cell phones and wireless laptops and we are all turned on in terms of connectivity, and therefore people know where we are,” she said. Source: Medill Reports

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Three faculty members from the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines are participating in a new $7.5 million study, led by the University of Pennsylvania and involving eight universities, that will “focus on the development of biologically inspired cooperative strategies for large teams of unmanned robots, including aerial and ground robots.” Source: University of Pennsylvania

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Certess, Inc., a provider of functional qualification tools for systems on a chip (SoCs) and intellectual property (IP) blocks, has formed a technical advisory board (TAB) that includes Dean Richard DeMillo and other academic leaders in computer science. Source: Business Wire

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A jury of industry and academic experts considered a record-breaking 518 submissions before choosing 90 papers for presentation at SIGGRAPH 2008. "These presentations give us a glimpse into a future with highly realistic computer games, stunning feature film special effects, intelligent cameras, and rich photo manipulation tools," said SIC Associate Professor Greg Turk, chair of the Technical Papers Jury. Source: Business Wire

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Ron Arkin, Tucker Balch, Henrik Christensen and Frank Dellaert of the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines are participating in a $38 million project involving nine universities and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory to build insect-sized robots for government spying operations. Source: New Hampshire Union Leader

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The Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship, a $10,000 academic award, is given annually by Google to women studying computer science who show a commitment to advancing women in technology. Three other CoC students and one student in ISyE were finalists for the award, each winning $1,000.

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A recent start-up company formed by students at MIT has developed the Handwear Computer Input Device (HCID), a lightweight computer glove that could greatly improve on earlier, heavier military technology. Thad Starner, an associate professor of computing at Georgia Tech University, says "The problem with most new soldier technologies is that people are trying to do too much.” Source: InventorSpot

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The College of Computing at Georgia Tech hosted its 17th Annual Awards Celebration on April 22, 2008. Master of Ceremony and CoC Dean Rich DeMillo led the College in congratulating students, faculty and staff on another exciting and productive year.

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Henrik I. Christensen, KUKA Chair of Robotics at CoC, will head a group of academic leaders from 11 universities in an effort to develop a unified research agenda for robotics across government, industry and academia, Georgia Tech and Carnegie Mellon University announced today in a joint statement.

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Larry F. Hodges has been named director of the School of Computing in the College of Engineering and Science at Clemson University effective July 1. In 1988, Hodges and colleague Bill Ribarsky started the Georgia Tech Computer Graphics Interest Group, or TechGraph, which eventually led to the founding of GVU in 1991. Source: Clemson University

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Thad Starner, an associate professor in the School of Interactive Computing, will present a lecture about wearable computers Wednesday at Berry College.  “Reading Your Mind: Interfaces for Wearable Computing” begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday, in the Berry College science auditorium. Admission is free. Source: Rome News Tribune

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The owner of a downtown Atlanta pub is using a homemade, remote-controlled robot to patrol the area and discourage people from loitering. Henrik Christensen, director of Georgia Tech's Robotics and Intelligent Machines Center, says the so-called "Bum Bot" exploits the anxiety that underlies Hollywood stereotypes of violent robots. Source: The Washington Post.

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Congratulations to the winners of the 2008 UROC! Seventeen teams competed for cash and prizes in this year's annual Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Computing Research Symposium, which took place April 16.

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A team consisting of a CoC graduate student in computer science and two other Georgia Tech grad students took third place in the University of Oregon’s New Venture Championship. Shwetak Patel (Ph.D. Computer Science) and his two teammates won $5,000 to invest in their business, ElectriSense.

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Research into the sometimes coordinated behavior of birds and bees is helping scientists create computer programs that can enhance surveillance photos, quickly sort through military reports and even enable individual robots to navigate within an army of fellow automatons. Tucker Balch, associate professor in the School of Interactive Computing, said “swarm intelligence” applied to some problems can result in pretty good solutions pretty quickly. Source: MSNBC

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Georgia Tech has honored three faculty members and three staff members from the College of Computing with awards for their service to the Institute.

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A half dozen undergraduates in the College of Computing have won President’s Undergraduate Research Awards (PURA) and will receive a salary to do research over the summer.

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A security company spun off from research conducted at The College of Computing has discovered a new botnet – Kraken – that allegedly has infected more than 400,000 computers worldwide to generate spam. CoC Associate Dean Merrick Furst, Associate Professor Wenke Lee, and Ph.D. student David Dagon founded Damballa.Source: Washington Post

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Professor Seymour (Sy) Goodman, jointly appointed to the College of Computing and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, returned to Capitol Hill for a fifth time last week to testify before lawmakers about ways to create a safer and more secure cyberspace.

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Following on from her well-received title Taking Your iPhone to the Max, Mac Guru and CoC alumna Erica Sadun switches her attention to Apple's newest super-gadget with her new book, Taking Your iPod touch to the Max. Sadun earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1996. Source: TechPedia

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Some homeowners assign names and genders to their Roombas. Others dress them in school colors, or refer to them as "my baby." A survey of nearly 400 Roomba owners conducted late last year by SIC Associate Professor Beki Grinter and grad student Ja-Young Sung shows the human-robot connection takes myriad forms. Source: New ScientistTech

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The College of Computing and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering are partnering with two leading Italian universities, the University of Trento and the Politecnico di Torino, to offer dual master’s degrees in computer science and electrical and computer engineering.

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Information technology permeates every aspect of the campus these days. At The Chronicle's Technology Forum, three experts – including Richard A. DeMillo, dean of the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology – spoke about what the future may hold for IT. "For good or bad, we are in the position of having to simultaneously react to what is going on in the IT industry and anticipate it," said DeMillo. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education.

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As military robots grow more sophisticated, some of their designers are trying to prevent autonomous ones making decisions or being used as killing machines. But CoC Regents' Professor Ronald Arkin says that because robots' judgments will be unclouded by fear or other emotions, they will be less likely than human soldiers to break the ethical conventions of war. Source: New Scientist Tech.

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CoC jumped into the Top 10 in the latest rankings of graduate computer science (CS) programs by U.S. News & World Report. Now ranked 9th in the nation overall, the CoC moved up from the 11th position held in 2007 and is now tied with the University of Texas-Austin. In CS specialty areas, the College moved up in Artificial Intelligence to 7th and in Systems to 10th. Theory was ranked 9th again, as last year.

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Increasingly autonomous, gun-toting robots developed for warfare pose a threat to humanity and may one day unleash a robot arms race, warns a top Canadian expert on artificial intelligence. But CoC Regents' Professor Ronald Arkin, who has worked closely with the US military on robotics, says the shift toward autonomy will be gradual and that robots may have a place on the front lines. Source: Canada.com

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IBM announced yesterday that it will collaborate with Georgia Tech and Ohio State University on an initiative to develop new autonomic technology for cloud computing. “(W)ithout the coordinated use of hardware, operating systems, middleware and applications, it will simply not be possible to meet the demands of tomorrow's critical applications and systems that support them," said Karsten Schwan, CERCS Director at Georgia Tech. Source: CNNMoney.com

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Georgia Tech and Ohio State University are planning today to announce a partnership with IBM Corp. to develop new technologies to advance autonomous computing on the Internet. Specifically, the researchers will focus on "cloud computing" initiatives, which combine the resources of computers in different locations using the Internet. Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution

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Have you ever been at a store and found what seems to be a good deal on a big-ticket item, but you wish you could find out right then and there what competing retailers are charging for the same thing? The winning hack at the recent Yahoo! Hackfest at CoC makes it possible.

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The Georgia Tech Table Tennis Club Team, whose eight members include five students from the College of Computing, has qualified for the National Collegiate Table Tennis Association National Championship, which will be held April 11-13 in Rochester, Minn.

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Students in robotics start out trying to maneuver a $100 robot, move onto studying robotic vacuum cleaners, and – if they stay in the program long enough – can even work on a driverless car. ”We take them forward, all the way through the undergraduate program and on to the new Ph.D. program,” said Associate Professor Tucker Balch of the School of Interactive Computing.  Source: WGCL-TV

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Graduates of computing programs are in demand and land higher-paying first jobs on average than graduates in most other fields, according to a recent article on Yahoo! Hot Jobs. A survey of 2007 Georgia Tech grads shows that those graduating with a B.S. in Computer Science reported the highest starting salary offer ($84,000) and the second highest median starting salary offer ($60,000) of all students graduating that year. Source: Yahoo! Hot Jobs

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Researchers at Intel have developed laptop-based security software that adjusts to the way an individual uses the Internet, providing a more dynamic and personalized approach to detecting malicious activity. Nick Feamster, assistant professor in the School of Computer Science, says that the behavioral approach to security hasn't been applied to laptops because there was no automated way of developing personalized rules. But behavioral botnet protection is "very well suited for machine learning," he says. Source: Technology Review

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David Rutter, a senior Computer Science major, has been selected by the College of Computing as this year's Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher. The award includes a certificate and a monetary stipend sponsored by the Georgia Tech Research Corporation. Selection for this award was based on David’s long-term, high-quality research work and for recognition of his work outside Georgia Tech.

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Oak Ridge Associated Universities will fund a series of high-performance computing grants for faculty and student teams. Thomas Zacharia, part-time professor in the Computational Science and Engineering Division and associate laboratory director for ORNL’s Computing and Computational Sciences Directorates, said “We all become stronger if we can bring the best of what the lab has to offer coupled with the best of what the university community has to offer. Source: The Oak Ridger

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Intel and Microsoft Corp. will invest $20 million over the next five years to fund software research at UC Berkeley and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to develop a new multicore chip that will put a slew of mini-processors, or cores, on a single sliver of silicon. "This is a really new time in the history of computing, truly a paradigm shift," said David Bader, associate professor in the Computational Science and Engineering Division.  Source: San Francisco Chronicle

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P.K. Yeung, adjunct professor in the Computational Science and Engineering Division and a leading scholar in the field of turbulence, is working on a study that, when completed, is expected to be a truly unique resource for the international research community and will play a key role in helping re-establish U.S. leadership in large-scale turbulence studies.  Source: Grid Today

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For the past 2 years, a response to an RFP has netted two unrestricted grants of about $40,000 for Associate Professor Frank Dellaert of the School of Interactive Computing to develop new online three-dimensional mapping technologies for Microsoft's Virtual Earth. Dellaert says the RFP application process is far less cumbersome than some federal grant applications, which require technical proposals 15 to 60 pages long. "With Microsoft, you write one page of text; there is no budget, just a back-of-the-envelope calculation. It's extremely painless."  Source: AAAS Science Magazine

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A robot that can pick up objects and hand them to people suffering from degenerative diseases, co-created by Assistant Professor Charlie Kemp of the Robotics and Intelligent Machines Center (RIM@GT), was unveiled March 12 at a conference in Amsterdam. Kemp, who is also director of Georgia Tech's Center for Healthcare Robotics, said his team focused on the ways the robot could interact with humans, not act like one. "How can you make robots that are actually useful? That was bugging me," Kemp said. "And it's a hard question to answer — that's why I'm happy with this."  Source: AJC

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Distinguished Professor and Dean of Computing Richard DeMillo has been re-elected to the Computing Research Association (CRA) Board of Directors. DeMillo’s new three-year term begins July 1, 2008. Two other CoC affiliates also are current CRA Board members: Professor Mary Jean Harrold of the School of Computer Science and alumna Annie I. Anton, a three-time graduate of the College of Computing (Ph.D. 1997, M.S. 1992, and B.S. 1990). Source: CRA

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“Georgia Tech has done a lot to revise their curriculum, and besides robotics they have a pretty cool media computation program that is attracting a lot of students,” said Alfred Thompson, K-12 Computer Science Academic Relations Manager for Microsoft, about reports that the number of newly declared undergraduate majors at doctoral-granting computer science departments is up for the first time since 2000. Source: MSDN

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In a blog post last month, Distinguished Professor and Dean of Computing Richard DeMillo described CAPTCHAs, the distorted text used as a security test to thwart Spammers and other Web site abuse, as “a leaking levee facing a hundred-year storm.”  Now ABC News reports that Spam originating from Google's Gmail domain doubled last month, indicating that spammers are still defeating the CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart).  Source: Virtual Blight

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School of Interactive Computing's Distinguished Professor Gregory Abowd will join the Computer Human Interaction Academy, an honorary group of scientists who are leading and shaping the study of HCI, at the CHI 2008 conference in Florence, Italy in April. “[Abowd’s] mathematical background is evident in the rigorous analysis that is the basis of his many research papers, and his work has led the way in demonstrating how ubicomp can solve real problems in our everyday lives,” according to the group’s website.

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Anind Dey (Ph.D. in Computer Science, 2000) has been awarded a research grant from Microsoft’s Intelligent Systems for Assisted Cognition RFP for his work on creating a system to help patients with Alzheimer’s recall episodic memories more effectively. Dey, now an Assistant Professor in the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, is developing and evaluating a memory prosthesis that uses contextual cues and automated techniques for determining what cues will help with memory recollection.

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Distinguished Professor Gregory Abowd, Associate Professor James Rehg, and Senior Research Scientist Rosa Arriaga  –  all of the School of Interactive Computing  –  have been awarded $50,000 in research funds by Microsoft Research for their work in developing behavioral imaging technologies to help in the early detection of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). They are working to develop an automated system for searching and coding video of social interaction studies.

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Ronald Arkin, Regents' Professor, suggests trying to design ethical control systems that make military robots respect the Geneva Convention and other rules of engagement on the battlefield. He is using computer simulations to test whether ethical control systems can be used in battlefield scenarios, some of which are modeled on real-life events.  Source: NewScientist

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"Robotics systems may have the potential to out-perform humans from a perspective of the laws of war and the rules of engagement," Ronald Arkin, Regents' Professor, told a conference on technology in warfare at Stanford University last month. He agrees that the shift towards autonomy will be gradual.  Source: The Age

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Robotics experts are at odds over ethical concerns in what some see as the beginning of an international robot arms race. The concern arises over having robots decide when to “pull the trigger.” Ronald Arkin, Regents' Professor, points out that human combatants are far from perfect on the battlefield. “With a robot I can be sure that a robot will never harbour the intention to hurt a non-combatant. Ultimately they will be able to perform better than humans.” Source: ThomasNet

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Giselle Martin, student recruitment director at the College of Computing, credits the new revised curriculum and ever widening job prospects for a 15 percent increase in undergraduate applications this year. “We’re placing students in Silicon Valley and all over the United States of course, but also in health care firms in Chile and embassies in Japan,” Martin said. “This is geek chic. Our students are getting sexy jobs.”  Source: Inside Higher Ed

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Associate Professor David Bader, Executive Director of High-Performance Computing, comments "There has to be a shorter time span between innovative ideas and that tech transfer.  It changes the traditional model of doing research and doing a slow handoff to industry and seeing it in a product in 10 to 20 years. Instead it's down to two and half to three years."  Source: MarketWatch

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One of the most memorable aspects of the Computation + Journalism Symposium was the fact that there were almost as many people live blogging the event as there were people in the room giving presentations.  Source: NSDL

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Regents' Professor Ronald Arkin and others are discussing robot ethics at length at a symposium called "The Ethics & Legal Implications of Unmanned Vehicles for Defence and Security Purposes," hosted by the Royal United Services Institute in London.  Source: MSNBC

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Pathfinder, a leading agile development and user experience design firm, announces the release of Noel Rappin’s newest book “Bullet Professional Ruby On Rails”.  Rappin is Pathfinder’s Director of Ruby on Rails Practice and has previously co-authored “wxPython in Action” and “Jython Essentials”.  Source: Pathfinder

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More than 200 people -- a mix of academics and professionals, editors and reporters, journalists and Web developers (including the two Knight Challenge journalist-programmer scholarship winners) -- came together to talk about the ways technology is changing journalism.  Source: PBS

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Two School of Computer Science faculty members, Nick Feamster in the Networking and Telecommunications Group and GTISC, and Adam Kalai in the Theory Group and ARC ThinkTank, have been awarded the prestigious Alfred P. Sloan fellowships for 2008.

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"Technology on campuses is starting to borrow customer-service techniques from Amazon and other online businesses. Or at least it needs to in order to meet the growing demands for such services from students," argued Richard A. DeMillo, Dean of Computing and Distinguished Professor.  Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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Kitchen Science Investigators, a research project led by Regents' Professor Janet Kolodner, is focused on implementing an educational program in which elementary and middle school students learn science and scientific reasoning through cooking. Watch CNN Coverage

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The Journalism 3G conference on February 22-22 will allow journalists and computer scientists, students and professionals, to share perspectives on the intersection of journalism and technology. Speakers include Krishna Bharat, principal scientist at Google and creator of Google News; Michael Skoler, executive director of the Center for Innovation in Journalism at American Public Media. Source: PBS

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A new contact lens embedded with electronic circuits could be the seed for "bionic eyes" that can see displays overlaid on a person's field of view, researchers say.  "If it works, it would be fabulous," said College of Computing Associate Professor Blair MacIntyre, who heads the Augmented Environments Lab.  Source: National Geographic News

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"Corrupted DNS Resolution Paths" was presented by College of Computing researchers David Dagon, Chris Lee and Wenke Lee, and Niels Provos of Google, at the Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS) in San Diego.  Source: PC Advisor

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The Colleges of Computing, Engineering, and Sciences at Georgia Tech today announced the creation of a new doctoral degree in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), a cooperative, truly interdisciplinary effort between the three academic units spearheaded by the Computational Science and Engineering division in the College of Computing.

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Dr. Jim Foley, founding director of the GVU Center, former CEO of Yamacraw, SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement Award winner, SIGGRAPH Steven Coons Award winner, Georgia Tech grad student superlative “Most Likely to Make Students Want to Grow Up to be Professors” winner, AAAS, ACM, and IEEE fellow, professor and author, has been elected to one of America’s most prestigious engineering institutions.  Source: National Academy of Engineering

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Assistant Professor Jonathon Giffin comments on how long it could take to break into hard drives protected by an encryption program. "The expected time it would take is years, decades, unless you have extremely powerful computers."  Source: ABC News

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Lockheed Martin Corp. is teaming up with College of Computing Associate Professor Ashwin Ram and researchers at other research institutions to develop technology designed to keep pilots safe while flying over battlefields. Source: Washington Technology

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The Blowable and Localized User Interaction interface that doctoral candidate Shwetak Patel and professor Gregory Abowd developed could help people work with computers when they can’t use their hands because they are either busy with other tasks or have a disability or injury. Source:  IEEE Computer Magazine

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As people age, staying at home has become much more of a luxury. Computing distinguished professor Gregory Abowd demonstrates how advances in technology are helping people care for their loved ones under their own roof. Source: CBS Evening News

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The Colleges of Computing and Engineering at Georgia Tech today announced the nation’s first truly interdisciplinary doctoral degree in robotics to be offered at Georgia Tech. The program, which starts fall semester of 2008, was developed through Georgia Tech’s Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM@Georgia Tech).

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Three College of Computing faculty members have written chapters in the recently published book by MIT Press titled HCI Remixed: Reflections on Works That have Influenced the HCI Community. The book is a collection of fifty-one essays on a range of works in a variety of forms that chart the emergence of many new fields in Human-Computer Interaction.

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College of Computing faculty member Mark Riedl's paper titled "Toward Intelligent Support of Authoring Machinima Media Content: Story and Visualization" has received the Best Paper award at the 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Technologies for Interactive Entertainment (INTETAIN) at Playa del Carmen, Cancun Mexico. The conference was organized in cooperation with ACM SIGCHI and took place January 8-10, 2008.

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College of Computing and School of Literature, Communication and Culture faculty members have devoloped the AR SecondLife client as part of the AR digital performance project, which is a step in combining the digital and virtual worlds into a single conflated space between two. Watch Video

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Pathfinder has named Noel Rappin, a College of Computing alum and author of "Professional Ruby On Rails" as Director of it's growing Ruby on Rails Practice. Rails is a full-stack web application development framework for developing rich, powerful applications. Source: PR Web

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Blair MacIntyre, a School of Interactive Computing associate professor is going to speak on "Mobile Augmented Reality Experiences" at the Optical Fiber Communication Conference and Exposition and the National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (OFC/NFOEC) at San Diego. Source: Photonics.com

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Mustaque Ahamad, College of Computing professor and director of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center comments on using the online money-management tools. He advises to check in regularly to make sure your information isn't being abused or used in a way one didn't expect. Source: Wall Street Journal

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The Interactive High Performance Computing Laboratory, celebrating its 12th year of hosting cluster computing resources and cutting-edge research for the GT community, has announced its newest facility.  The new facility cores are focused at several levels and are now available for the wider campus community.

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