Matrix manipulation, one of the most fundamental mathematical tools outside of everyday arithmetic, has seen its first improvement in 24 years. "All this is extremely exciting," says Richard Lipton (Computer Science). "[It] is one of the best results proved in years in all of theory." Source: New Scientist

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A vision of African-born--and African-educated--computer scientists is taking shape at Makerere University in Uganda, dovetailing nicely with a College of Computing report recommending that African CS programs incorporate local needs into their curricula. Source: The New York Times

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Paul Royal (Computer Science) says the recently introduced Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act in the U.S. House has to overcome a history of "one-way" information sharing between government and private industry. Source: Redmondmag.com

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As U.S. soldiers leave Iraq, the battlefield of the Internet is heating up, says the Georgia Tech Emerging Cyber Threats Report for 2012, citing search poisoning, mobile-based attacks and new black markets for personal information as three of the biggest cyber threats for the new year. Source: SmallBizTechnology.com

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing), director of the Center for Robotics and Intelligent Machines, says the U.S. robotics industry is poised to grow--and create jobs--in nearly every region of the country (audio story). Source: Minnesota Public Radio

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Don't know what gift to get the techie in your family? Check out this holiday gift guide, courtesy of the Georgia Tech College of Computing. It might give you an idea or, at least, a good laugh. Source: Midtown Patch

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Network World and its sister sites have produced a seemingly endless number of gift guides, and they're far from alone. But even the NW editors were surprised to see Georgia Tech's College of Computing pump out one of its own, highlighting some of the most clever creations to come from students and faculty this past year. Source: Network World

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At the center of the push for more "socially aware" robots is a group of women leading the charge. Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) is certainly one of them, and the goal for her robot, Simon, is for it to learn from people through regular human interactions, rather than programming. Source: Fast Company

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In a war-torn nation of 4 million people and one psychiatrist, how can good mental health care be cost-effectively delivered? That's a central research question in Ellen Zegura's (Computer Science) Computing for Good partnership with the Carter Center's Mental Health Liberia program. Source: Psych Central

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Doctors at Children's Hospital Boston are sending some young patients home with robots to help the doctors continue treatment and monitor progress remotely. Expect more "robo-docs" in the months and years to come, says Charlie Kemp (Interactive Computing). Source: ABC News

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MIT is doubling down on its OpenCourseWare program, offering more online course content and certificates to indicate content mastery--all for free. "I think [this] will make quite a splash," says Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), director of the Center for 21st Century Universities. "If I were still in industry and someone came in with an M.I.T.x credential, I’d take it.” Source: The New York Times

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ATLANTA – Dec. 15, 2011 – With 10 shopping days left until the biggest holiday of the year, the Georgia Tech College of Computing has released its own unique spin on the traditional holiday gift guide, showcasing some of the year’s biggest research stories and providing top technologists with all sorts of “gift” ideas for this holiday season.

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Georgia Tech student Vivian Stepp and faculty member Julie Champion will spend Friday, December 9, at the White House as part of the Obama Administration’s “Champions of Change” roundtable event.

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Embedded smartphone software that logs users' keystokes, text messages and other data to send back to the carrier? "Not kosher," says Georgia Tech Information Security Center Director Mustaque Ahamad (Computer Science). Source: The New York Times

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The College's Center for 21st Century Universities is taking the long view--as in, the next 100 years--of higher ed. "While technology is not the only enabler of change in higher education," says Director Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), "it is on the critical path to all foreseeable change." Source: Education-Portal.com

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Young African-American and Latino men play video games more than any other group, but they are not well represented in computer science. Betsy DiSalvo's (Interactive Computing) Glitch Game Testers is trying to change the latter by capitalizing on the former. Source: DMLcentral

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A new cyber security bill before the House of Representatives aimed at facilitating the sharing of information between government and the private sector addresses longstanding concerns that such sharing is a one-way street, says Paul Royal (Computer Science), adding that the government historically has been a "black hole of information." Source: Government Computer News

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Now studying computational media at Georgia Tech, Makario Lewis doesn’t run into existential issues with being a black nerd – there are plenty of people just like him, especially in the College of Computing where he spends most of his time. Source: CNN.com

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David Bader (CompSci & Eng) discusses the DARPA Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales (ADAMS) program, which uses "Big Data" analytics to look for cleared personnel who might be on the verge of becoming internal security threats (video). Source: InsideHPC

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The College of Computing prefers students who are "creative and expressive with computing," says Assistant Dean Cedric Stallworth. "You shouldn't be learning Java just to learn Java. You should be learning Java because you want to create a game, and Java is a tool that helps you do that. That puts computing in the right context." Source: Network World

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David Bader (CompSci & Eng), now hailed officially as a "rock star" of high performance computing, has been fascinated by computers ever since he received his first one, a PDP-11/45, back in 1972. Source: InsideHPC

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The IEEE Board of Directors has elected professors Irfan Essa and Magnus Egerstedt (both Interactive Computing) as Fellows in its Class of 2012. Source: Office of Communications

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David Dagon (Computer Science) is co-author of a Sandia National Labs report arguing that the Stop Online Privacy Act currently before the House of Representatives could particularly hinder security improvements to the Internet's domain name system. Source: CNET

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Can supercomputers help sniff out potential rogue employees before they do harm? David Bader (CompSci & Eng) and a multi-institutional team of researchers are using a DARPA grant to find out. Source: Defense Systems

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Augmented reality is finding its way into toy stores this holiday season, showing customers what toys would look like fully assembled, and that's just the beginning, says Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) (video). Source: CNN.com

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David Bader (CompSci & Eng) is part of a multi-university research team developing algorithms to analyze massive data sets and identify possible unusual activity by employees in sensitive industries, such as national defense. Source: Science Blog

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) says the laboratory built with the donated equipment will be used for three purposes: creating optimization algorithms for logistics; testing sensing equipment; and supporting the annual Virtual Manufacturing and Automation Challenge. Source: Associated Press

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"Universities do not like to dwell on their value," writes Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), author of Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities. "There are many who try to cast any such discussion as the opening volley of a holy war between true academicians and infidels who would sacrifice noble pursuits for economic gain." Source: The Guardian

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Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing) believes "lethal autonomy is inevitable" but also that it is possible to build ethical military drones and robots, capable of using deadly force while programmed to adhere to international humanitarian law and rules of engagement. Source: Ukiah Daily Journal

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“Malicious functionality might do things like steal your credentials--we call it spyware,” says Jon Giffin (Computer Science). “It might spy on the password you are typing into a browser. It might ... turn on a microphone so your cell phone now becomes a bug that's transmitting an audio signal to the attacker." (video) Source: WAGA

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New video-tracking algorithms can identify and follow individual players in a sporting competition, even those in the middle of a crowded scrum--something that's been very difficult for computer vision to do. "This system can now handle that in a lot of different situations," says Aaron Bobick (Interactive Computing). Source: Discovery News

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In response to possible exposures of student data protected by the Family & Educational Right to Privacy Act (FERPA), the College of Computing has taken down all past course websites stored on College servers. Source: Office of Communications

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A research team headed by Georgia Tech Professor of Chemistry David Sherrill has developed a computer program that can study larger molecules faster than any other program in existence. The analysis program is designed to improve knowledge about why certain molecules are attracted to each other and how those relationships can be "tuned" to improve drug development.

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Christopher Klaus, founder and CEO of Kaneva and namesake of the Klaus Advanced Computing Building, has been named to the annual "40 Under 40" list of Atlanta's rising business and community leaders (subscription required). Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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A new, 3,400-square-foot manufacturing logistics lab initially will be outfitted with $944,000 in KUKA-built hardware from a prototype Coca-Cola bottling plant, says Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing). Source: Modern Materials Handling

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) says the new lab will allow faculty and students to better study the use of robotics in supply chain and fleet management. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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“When people start attacking infrastructure, it creates the potential for a rogue version of the Internet,” says David Dagon (Computer Science), who assisted U.S. law enforcement in breaking up an Internet advertising scam originating out of Eastern Europe. Source: The New York Times

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ATLANTA – Nov. 10, 2011 – The College of Computing’s Robotics and Intelligent Machines Center will use a gift of nearly $1 million of robotics equipment from Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated to create a Manufacturing Robotics Logistics Laboratory on the Georgia Tech campus. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech's GLITCH program is one of several nationwide focused on bringing underrepresented groups such as African Americans and Latinos into the world of computer science and technology. Source: CNN.com

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Too often university science and engineering students wash out because the course work is simply too challenging. Georgia Tech addressed this problem by customizing its introductory computer science classes according to student majors, says Mark Guzdial (Interactive Computing). Source: The Wall Street Journal

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In the 2012 Emerging Cyber Threats Report, Georgia Tech researchers name three cyber attacks likely to be most prevalent in the coming year, targeting Internet search engines, smartphones and individual computers. Source: WYFF Greenville

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ATLANTA – Nov. 8, 2011 – Researchers from the Georgia Tech College of Computing, working in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), have developed a digital data tracking system to assist low-resource clinical laboratories in developing countries. Source: Office of Communications

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Technology is rapidly commoditizing the information that's disseminated in college courses, says Rich DeMillo (Computer Science). "If you can easily access a lecture in quantum mechanics from the best lecturer on quantum mechanics, how many other quantum mechanics lectures do you need?" It's the intellectual discussion of these facts where professors add value, he says. Source: The New York Times

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"By a large majority," says Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), "the American public thinks that it’s not getting value for the tuition dollar. It thinks that universities are not doing a good job." DeMillo is director of the Center for 21st Century Universities and author of the new book, Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities. Source: Lawlor Review

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Researchers led by Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) have shown how placing a phone on a desk could allow its accelerometer to detect the vibrations from key presses on a nearby keyboard and pick out words with an accuracy of up to 80%. Source: InformationWeek

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Before a packed auditorium in the middle of Georgia Tech’s Homecoming week, Microsoft’s Research Chief Strategy Officer—and two-time Tech alumnus—Craig Mundie, EE 1971, MS CS 1972, laid out a technology-enhanced vision of the future. And that future, he said, is not so far away. Source: Office of Communications

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The United States could soon face a "crash" of student loan defaults, says Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), director of the Center for 21st Century Universities. "Students are going to be coming out of school with diplomas and not necessarily able to recover the value they put into their degrees." (video) Source: Fox Business Channel

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What broadband users need is a connectivity thermostat that they can use to better manage how they access their ISP’s pipes. At a recent conference Nick Feamster (Computer Science) described Project Bismark, an effort to help users manage their bandwidth caps and allocate broadband resources inside the home. Source: GigaOM

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ATLANTA - Oct. 25, 2011 - The College of Computing today announced a direct effort leveraging the strength of graduate programs and relationships with a number of undergraduate institutions to increase the number of women in computing. Source: Office of Communications

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According to Patrick Traynor (Computer Science), a stranger's smartphone could potentially pick up data typed into a nearby laptop computer by using the phone's accelerometer to detect vibrations produced by typing. Source: Examiner

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In researching an "ethical adaptor" to be programmed into autonomous military robots, Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing) was struck by how many atrocities human soldiers witnessed, committed or abetted. "Human beings have never been designed to operate under the combat conditions of today. [These conditions] exacerbate the potential for violation of laws of war." Source: Christian Science Monitor

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OpenStudy, cofounded by Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing), offers students the option to create or join online study groups, subscribe to other students' updates, and provides students with a place to record their notes online. And they can register for OpenStudy using their email addresses or through their Facebook accounts. Source: Free Tech for Teachers

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The attack using a smartphone's accelerometer attempts to predict keystrokes in pairs, says Patrick Traynor (Computer Science), using the distance between keys and their position on the keyboard as hints for a custom dictionary. As long as the word is longer than two letters, the system has a good chance of detecting what’s been pressed. Source: Gizmodo

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How worried should you be that the phone sitting near your desktop is conspiring against you? Not too much--the chances of becoming a victim of this type of advanced attack are slim, for now. "This was really hard to do," said Patrick Traynor (Computer Science). "But could people do it if they really wanted to? We think yes." Source: MSNBC

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In his presentation at this week's Open Network Summit in San Francisco, Nick Feamster (Computer Science) said the simplicity enabled by OpenFlow and software-defined networks can be used to make more powerful and easier-to-use network management tools. Source: Network World

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You sit down at your desk, set down your mobile phone, boot your computer and then start work. Would it occur to you that a hacker might be using your smartphone as a spying device to track what you were typing? Source: ComputerWorld

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As you logged into your favorite blog to write a comment this morning, think about where your smartphone was sitting. Was it next to your keyboard? If so, a hacker could have used it to track and decipher every word of your insightful anonymous commentary. Source: Popular Science

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What if a hacker could log every key you typed on your PC by placing a cellphone nearby? Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues have shown how this is possible using the latest generation of smartphones. Source: Times of India

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If you're looking for a reason (other than price) to buy an iPhone 3GS as opposed to an iPhone 4, here's one: according to Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) it's possible that malware on an iPhone 4 can detect and deduce what someone is typing on a nearby keyboard. Source: Gizmag

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One project supported by the NSF General & Age Related Disabilities Engineering Program involves a team of Georgia Tech engineers developing wireless technology that can convert a user’s tongue motions to specific commands, such as moving a mouse cursor or a powered wheelchair. Source: Washington Post

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Specifically, the grant comes from the Department of Education’s National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research The money will go to the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC), a collaboration between Shepherd Center and Georgia Tech. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Higher education institutions that spend millions of dollars building sports teams of virtually professional standard are symptomatic, says Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), of many American universities that have become too focused on inappropriate and often unwinnable competitions. Source: Times Higher Education

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Similar keylogging methods have been developed using a smartphone's microphone, but malware masquerading as a legitimate app can usually access a smartphone's accelerometer without tripping built-in security features, according to researcher Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues. Source: Ars Technica

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Did you know your smartphone's accelerometer can be used to steal keystrokes from a nearby keyboard? Using an iPhone 4, Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues have managed to capture complete sentences with up to 80 percent accuracy. Source: PC World

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Robots can be--and are being--used as companions for older adults, but the practice is not without its ethical concerns. "Are we abrogating our responsibilities to our fellow human beings by suddenly saying, 'The robot can take care of you?'" asks Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing). Source: ABC News

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By exploiting smartphones' accelerometers, hackers could detect and even decipher words typed on a nearby keyboard, says research by Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues. Source: Network World

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Smartphone users, beware! Hackers could use your mobile to find out what you are typing on a nearby computer at your workplace, says Patrick Traynor (Computer Science). Source: Zee News

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Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) says seemingly innocuous apps, once downloaded, could contain malware that would use smartphones' accelerometers to spy on nearby keyboards. Source: Wired

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The danger of smartphone accelerometers as a cyber-attack vector, says Patrick Traynor (Computer Science), is that applications typically can gain access to a phone's accelerometer without user approval. Source: Science a Go Go

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Georgia Tech researchers led by Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) have discovered how smartphones' accelerometers on smart phones can collect meaningful data by sensing nearby keyboard vibrations. Source: Government Computer News

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Georgia Tech and the Shepherd Center have been awarded a $4.75 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education for research and development of wireless technologies aimed at enhancing the lives of people with disabilities. Source: GT Communcations & Marketing

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A research team led by Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) has discovered how to program a smartphone to sense nearby keyboard vibrations and decipher complete sentences with up to 80 percent accuracy. Source: Office of Communications

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ATLANTA – Oct. 11, 2011 – The year ahead will feature new and increasingly sophisticated means to capture and exploit user data, as well as escalating battles over the control of online information that threatens to compromise content and erode public trust and privacy. Those were the findings made by the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) and the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) in today's release of the Georgia Tech Emerging Cyber Threats Report for 2012. Source: Office of Communications

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ATLANTA – Oct. 11, 2011 – Today the citizens of Liberia will elect a president, eight years after the end of its civil war, with the specter of violence still hanging overhead. But what if social media, Professor Michael Best (Interactive Computing) is asking, could identify and even help prevent dangerous situations from occurring? Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech has been awarded two highly selective National Science Foundation grants totaling $2 million. The awards, designated for the College of Computing and the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, will fund two projects intended to change how high school students and teachers learn computer science. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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The National Science Foundation has awarded $6 million through its Division of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation to fund three projects involving researchers from Georgia Tech, including Karen Liu and Charlie Kemp (Interactive Computing). Source: GT Research News

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Intel has announced its newest Science and Technology Center, dedicated to pervasive computing and including Gregory Abowd and Jim Rehg (both Interactive Computing) as two of its member researchers. The new center is intended to foster technologies that offer a richer, more personalized experience to consumers of the future. Source: Intel

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OWL, one of the world’s most popular online reference/resource site for writers and writing, recently partnered with Ashwin Ram’s (Interactive Computing) OpenStudy, the "Match.com for online learning." Source: Valpolife.com

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Thanks to Rich DeMillo (Computer Science) and the Center for 21st Century Universities, Georgia Tech is shaking up traditional education by offering its first massive open online course (MOOC), which allowins students to encounter leaders and classmates from around the world via blogs, twitter, emails and through a global study group. Source: Innovating Education

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Two-time College of Computing graduate Shwetak Patel has been awarded a “genius” grant from the MacArthur Foundation. As one of 22 MacArthur Fellows, Patel can use the no-strings-attached $500,000 fellowship in any way he chooses. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Thanks to Rich DeMillo (Computer Science) and the Center for 21st Century Universities, Georgia Tech is shaking up traditional education by offering its first massive open online course (MOOC), which allowins students to encounter leaders and classmates from around the world via blogs, twitter, emails and through a global study group. Source: Innovating Education

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Dr. Ronald Arkin (Interactive Computing) comments on the future of autonomous robotics in the military. Arkin believes it is possible to build ethical military drones and robots, capable of using deadly force while programmed to adhere to international humanitarian law and the rules of engagement. Source: Washington Post

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Richard A. DeMillo (Computer Science) has released a new book, Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities. Abelard represents the medieval ideal of scholar/teacher/philosopher while Apple is the world of iTunes U. Source: Inside Higher Ed

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Through inspiration from the human brain, David Bader (High Performance Computing) and colleagues are working to bring the “thinking” computer “closer to reality.” Although highly efficient, it’s unlikely these innovations will ever replace humans. Source: ZDNet

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With the billions of data traveling across the internet increasing, Dr. Nick Feamster (Computer Science) has proposed tiered strategies to protect against falling prices for transit providers while providing customers fare rates. Source: The Economist

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Undergrad Karthik Narayan and Charles Isbell (Interactive Computing) have advanced natural language generation (NLG) systems in computers to be twice as fast as they are today. The new program is capable of learning templates on its own, allowing developers to input only basic information about any given topic of conversation. Source: Engadget

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It has become easier to teach computers to talk. Undergrad Karthik Narayan and Charles Isbell (Interactive Computing) have developed new natural language generation (NLG) systems, allowing programs to use language templates more efficiently. Source: North Carolina State University

 

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Disaster preparation is an increasing necessity, and Georgia Tech researchers have created LifeNet, a supportive software that needs no existing infrastructure to establish an ad hoc network. Source: Disaster Recovery Journal

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At the top of the Internet's network architecture, says Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science), protocols are so specialized that they rarely compete with one another, enabling them to "survive" longer than lower-level protocols. Source: Tom's Hardware

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A study by Nick Feamster (Computer Science) and colleagues may have identified a pricing "sweet spot" for Internet transit providers, finding a balance between simplicity and efficiency. Source: Technology Review

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In the natural world, species that share the same ecosystem often compete for resources, resulting in the extinction of weaker competitors. Something similar happened as Internet protocols evolved, and Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) says designers of tomorrow's Internet would do well to understand it. Source: Scientific Computing

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Ph.D. student Craig Tashman's LiquidText, which allows users to annotate, highlight and manipulate PDF content with multitouch gestures, may be the next major step toward making etextbooks more practical for students. Source: O'Reilly Radar

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With thousands of users all over the world engaged in collaborative learning, it's no surprise that Ashwin Ram's (Interactive Computing) OpenStudy was voted the Best Student Participation winner in the OpenCourseWare People's Choice Awards. Source: Education-Portal.com

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When disaster takes down communications infrastructure, text messages through LifeNet could cost 100 times less than when using satellite phones, says graduate student Hrushikesh Mehendale, who worked with Santosh Vempala (Computer Science) to design the system. Source: Huffington Post

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The shift away from simple, blended-rate pricing shows the Internet interconnection market maturing--and becoming more efficient, according to Nick Feamster (Computer Science) and colleagues. Source: Ars Technica

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LifeNet, designed by Santosh Vempala (Computer Science) and colleagues, bridges connectivity between a satellite phone or other Internet gateway and a WiFi-based network on the ground, extending coverage from one computer with access to the entire independent network in the field. Source: ECNMag.com

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Two papers presented last week by Georgia Tech researchers at SIGCOMM 2011 could have big implications for Internet providers and policymakers. Source: TMCnet.com

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"It's just a piece of code that you can have on your laptop or phone," says Santosh Vempala (Computer Science) of LifeNet, the mobile ad hoc networking software he helped create. "Once you have the software, the computers can communicate with each other, and you don't need infrastructure." Source: Fast Company

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Georgia Tech, a top tier university with big time athletics, offers plenty of video game-specific courses and opportunites. Source: Huffington Post

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Constantine Dovrolis' (Computer Science) winning application, DiffProbe, and the other entries into the FCC Open Internet Challenge will help "ensure that consumers and the marketplace pick winners and losers online, and that websites or applications aren't improperly blocked or slowed," said FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski. Source: O'Reilly Radar

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The key to a secure online world of tomorrow? That would be an Internet that spends a bit more time padding its waistline at the protocol buffet, according to Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) and his colleagues. Source: Engadget.com

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Next time you're trapped in a burning building, put your hands together and pray that researchers Ayanna Howard (Interactive Computing) and Paul Robinette will send their small, mobile rescue robots to help out. Source: AZoRobotics.com

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Georgia Tech College of Computing researchers led by Santosh Vempala (Computer Science) have developed a mobile ad-hoc information network called LifeNet designed to help first responders communicate after disasters. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Wholesale broadband providers can enhance their profit margins by instituting a small number of pricing “tiers,” concludes a new study by Nick Feamster (Computer Science) and colleagues. Source: Office of Communications

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A new computer model designed by Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) that describes the evolution of the Internet's architecture suggests a process similar to natural evolution took place to determine which protocols survived and which became extinct. Source: GT Research News

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An outreach program run by the Georgia Institute of Technology and Morehouse College, GLITCH, serves as a platform to conduct research on computer science education. Research findings indicate that paying these young men may be a critical component in leading them to value the contributions they can make in the world of technology. Source: Office of Communications

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A team led by Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) was named co-winner of the FCC's Open Internet Challenge competition for a paper describing two tools, DiffProbe and ShaperProbe, that measure network performance. Source: PCWorld

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Aimed at shaping the future of cloud computing and how increasing numbers of everyday devices will add computing capabilities, Intel Labs announced the latest Intel Science and Technology Centers. Source: Intel

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When it comes to broadband speeds, ISPs should provide a broadband “nutrition label”—easy-to-understand information about service-limiting factors—and users need better ways of measuring the performance their ISPs are delivering, concludes a College of Computing study. Source: Office of Communications

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Charlie Kemp, director of the Healthcare Robotics Lab at Georgia Tech, discusses how he hopes the technology that is helping Henry Evans can be expanded over time to help people every day.

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Henry Evans is helping demonstrate the enormous potential robots have for helping those with disabilities. With the help of engineers from Willow Garage, the Healthcare Robotics Lab at Georgia Tech and a PR2 robot, Evans was able to shave himself for the first time in 10 years. 

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) comments on the usefulness of having a simple robot for hostile environments. 

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Engineers at the Willow Garage and Georgia Tech's Healthcare Robotics Lab are helping Henry Evans regain some independence through the use of a robot. 

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Georgia Tech start-up OpenStudy is hoping to make a worldwide study group by allowing the students to be the teachers.

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BISMark routers, as part of the M-Lab project, will continuously take measurements of a user’s ISP performance. And according to Nick Feamster (Computer Science), very soon users will have a web page they can go to to explore these measurements.

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) and other researchers working on the BISMark project have just released a BISmark measurement router which monitors the performance of the internet. Because this is done through a router, researchers will be able to distinguish between performance issues caused by an ISP or a user's home network. 

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Henry Evans, a mute quadriplegic, in conjunction with Georgia Tech’s Healthcare Robotics Lab and Willow Garage, is using the help of a PR2 robot to do something that he hasn't been able to do in years- scratch his own itch. 

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Robots for Humanity- lead by Georgia Tech's Healthcare Robotics Lab and Willow Garage- is a project that hopes to use robots and modern technology to help those who cannot help themselves.

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Assistant Professor Nina Balcan (Computer Science) has been awarded a 2011 Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship to pursue her work addressing foundational questions in machine learning, algorithmic game theory and optimization. Source: Office of Communications

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Henry Evans, a man who can only move one finger and his head after a stroke that occurred in his forties, is reclaiming some independence thanks to a PR2 robot and a team of researchers from Georgia Tech's Healthcare Robotics Lab and Willow Garage. (video story) 

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At a press conference hosted by the top internet engineers, David Dagon (Computer Science) forewarned of the large-scale threat of the Senate passing the PROTECT IP Act. 

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The researchers at the Healthcare Robotic Lab at Georgia Tech and the robot startup Willow Garage are working on Robots for Humanity- a project that hopes to introduce robots that can help the physically impaired with their day-to-day tasks. 

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Craig Tashman and Keith Edwards (both Interactive Computing) comment on how their reading software LiquidText helps create a more flexible workspace that gives the user the ability to create their own navigational structures. (registration required)

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Georgia Tech partnered with WizKidz Science and Technology Centers to present a robotic workshop to visually impaired students. Professor Ayanna Howard (Interactive Computing) was there to help show the kids that they too have the ability to go into STEM fields. 

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David Sherrill (CompSci & Eng) comments on how the idea of breaking aromaticity to enhance pi-pi interactions is eye opening to the scientific community.

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Georgia Tech's Nick Feamster (Computer Science) and Ellen Zegura (Computer Science) take part in a discussion about the future of the internet.

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Facebook will be opening up an office on Howell Mill Road and Marietta Street. Perfectly positioned to take on all of the Georgia Tech talent. 

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Grad student Fatima Boujarwah (Computer Science) is working on developing a model of social scripts that she hopes will help autistic children navigate complex social situations.

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Craig Tashman (Interactive Computing) and Keith Edwards (Interactive Computing) have created Liquid Text, an active reading tool that provides a large workspace and touch screen technology to streamline the active reading process. 

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Associate Professor Keith Edwards (Interactive Computing) and grad student Craig Tashman (Interactive Computing) have created LiquidText, a software that allows active readers to annotate in an innovative way. 

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy connects students to other students who are studying the same subject and can help answer their questions. 

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The Federal Communications Commission is encouraging development of applications that help determine how “open” the Internet is—and College of Computing faculty are responding to the challenge. Source: Office of Communications

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Graduate student Craig Tashman has developed LiquidText, a new software that facilitates an innovative approach to active reading. Source: GT Research News

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President Obama's new National Robotics Initiative to coordinate previously fragmented cutting-edge robotics research, says Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing).

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing), KUKA Chair of Robotics for Georgia Tech, to serve as an academic and research leader on a new National Robotics Initiative announced by President Obama today. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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A College of Computing spinoff company, Damballa, provides a service called FirstAlert that provides intelligence on bonet-infected systems.

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Eric Gilbert's (Interactive Computing) Courteous.ly, an email load tracker, not only lets people know how busy your inbox is, but also gives users options in corresponding with you after receiving that information. 

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) and other researchers working on the MAST project have developed autonomous robots that can map unknown areas. This is the first step towards their ultimate objective of small autonomous robots that can go anywhere and relay information back to humans. 

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Eric Gilbert's (Interactive Computing) new email load tool Courteous.ly takes your average email load and lets others know how full your inbox is based on that average.

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Eric Gilbert's (Interactive Computing) tool Courteous.ly works with Gmail to let friends and colleagues know how much email load you have. (Video Story)

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Greg Turk (Interactive Computing) and his team have created a computer model that can generate a creature's motion in water.

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Researchers at Georgia Tech expose the traffic shaping methods of American ISPs.

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Imagine a day when the human race is outnumbered by robots. How will we relate to them? And will we stay in control? Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) lends his expertise to these questions and more (podcast). Source: BBC The Forum

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OpenStudy, the platform for “massively multi-player study groups" co-founded by Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing), now has upwards of 40,000 users in 143 countries worldwide. Its math group alone sees 20,000 questions posted each month. Source: TechCrunch

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When the FBI shut down the Russian-based Coreflood botnet in April, it marked the first time a U.S. law enforcement agency had thwarted a botnet by hijacking its command-and-control system, according to Wenke Lee (Computer Science). Source: Bloomberg News

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Could a device developed in the lab of Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) for establishing meaningful communication between humans and dolphins one day be used in the search for extraterrestrial life? Source: Mother Nature Network

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Given that email is the Internet's first and most prolific social medium, Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) has developed a software tool to help users manage and send email more, well, Courteous.ly. Source: IT Pro

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In the third Random Hacks of Kindness event, held June 2 in the Tech Square Centergy Building for Atlanta participants, hackers applied their skills to solutions for disaster response and other societal problems. Source: CNN.com

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David Dagon (Computer Science) is part of a team that wrote a report on the implications of the Protect IP Act. 

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Along with tracking email load, Eric Gilbert's (Interactive Computing) Courteous.ly also has other options- such as the option to give one sentence subject lines priority in your inbox. 

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The Georgia Tech MAST processing team, in working together with other robotic scientists from around the country, has developed the first generation of autonomous robots that can map out both known and unknown environments. 

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Courteous.ly, the equivalent to an email load stock ticker, was created by Georgia Tech researcher Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing). The tool allows email senders to be a little more, courteous.

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Eric Gilbert's (Interactive Computing) Courteous.ly monitors your inbox for 12 hours to learn your average email load and then updates every ten minutes to let others know whether or not it's a good time to send an email.

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy connects anytime learning with anytime study help. 

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Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) comments on how Courteous.ly manages expectations of the email sender- creating the opportunity to filter from the other side.

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Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing) is working on making sure that 3-D printing tools are ready for the future wave of at-home 3-D printing hobbyists.

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Georgia Tech's Jon Giffin (Computer Science) comments on the security of internet sites.

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School of Interactive Computing Assistant Professor Eric Gilbert has developed software called courteous.ly, a service that shows current user email loads in real-time. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Eric Gilbert's (Interactive Computing) Courteous.ly allows others to understand your email overload by giving them a unique link that shows them whether or not it's a good time to send an email. 

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David Dagon (Computer Science) co-authored a report on a section of the new PROTECT IP Act which detailed how requiring DNS filtering could do more harm than good. 

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Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing) talks about how, through OpenStudy, learning can be widely accessible and engaging- two things traditional education has been lacking. 

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) and his team are working on improving their mapping robots to be able to survive harsh conditions to help first responders.

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Georgia Tech's Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) has created Courteous.ly - an app that takes into account how much email overload you have currently and then tells others how to proceed through a link you can add onto your email signature.

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OpenStudy, the online social study group co-founded by Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing), is partnering with the National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning (NPTEL) in India.

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Georgia Tech's Partha Kanuparthy (Computer Science) and Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) introduce new findings on traffic shaping by the major US ISPs using their new tool ShaperProbe.

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) and his colleagues have created small robo-explorers that can work as a team to create a floor map of unknown spaces. This is a major milestone in the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) Collaborative Technology Alliance Program funded by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. 

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Pindrop Security, a new company based on technology developed by School of Computer Science researchers to verify caller ID, has won the 2011 GRA/TAG Business Launch Competition. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech researchers Partha Kanuparthy (Computer Science) and Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) have created ShaperProbe - a tool that measures traffic shaping by ISPs.

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy has added game features to their network in order to reward participants and encourage more socialization. 

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Partha Kanuparthy (Computer Science) and Constantine Dovrolis (Computer Science) can tell you exactly how American ISPs shape traffic using their ShaperProbe tool. 

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Supercomputing is having a supercharging impact on the life sciences, and none more than genomics. David Bader and Mark Borodovsky (CompSci & Eng) write about genomics research made possible through high performance computing. Source: Scientific Computing

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Ronald Arkin (Interactive Computing) comments on the importance of human-robot interaction for Luna, the newest open-source household robot from Silicon Valley.

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Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) is working on the CHAT project- where he is using his computing know-how to help researchers try to begin communicating with dolphins. 

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As part of the MAST program, Georgia Tech's Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) has helped create robots that can simultaneously map and explore unknown territory.

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Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing) shows how his app Trimensional uses angled lighting from an iPhone to create a 3D image. (Video story) 

 

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) comments on why having robots like the one he and his colleagues are working on are important to first responders such as firefighters and soldiers. 

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Robots map out buildings autonomously using two cameras and laser scanners. These robots are currently being further developed by Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) and others as part of the MAST program.

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Henrik Christensen's (Interactive Computing) robots communicate with each other in order to ensure they are mapping an entire area quickly and completely.

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) and Wenke Lee (Computer Science) talk about their latest research on developing tools that can be used to show if the internet is blocked and who is blocking it in an effort to have more transparency across the globe.

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) and his other colleagues working on the MAST project have created robots that can map an unknown are using the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) technique. 

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Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) and Alex Hill (Interactive Computing) discuss their experience with Augmented Reality through the years and the creation of the Argon application. (Podcast) 

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Henrik Christensen's (Interactive Computing) robots explore buildings and communicate with each other to create detailed floor maps for humans as part of the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) Collaborative Technology Alliance Program. 

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) discusses how the autonomous robots him and his colleagues have created help humans better understand their surroundings in dangerous situations.

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Beki Grinter's (Interactive Computing) Kermit makes network speeds easily visible to consumers. 

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The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences has named Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) to the Robotics Technology Consortium’s Board of Directors. Source: Office of Communications

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Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) is working on the Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT) project whose goal is to facilitate two-way communication between humans and dolphins.

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As part of the CHAT project, Thad Starner's (Interactive Computing) computer program will go down with research divers. The program will try to recognize dolphin sounds and create responses in real time. 

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Developed by Beki Grinter and Ph.D. candidate Marshini Chetty (Interactive Computing), Kermit is an easy-to-use application that allows users to monitor and control network usage within their home environment. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Beki Grinter and Marshini Chetty (Interactive Computing) launch Kermit, a new tool that allows people to see and limit the bandwidth being consumed by every device used in a household.

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Georgia Tech's Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) and the Wild Dolphin Project have developed a project called Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT) in hopes of creating a new language that both humans and dolphins can understand.

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Georgia Tech is launching a four-month accelerator program twice a year to back anywhere from 12-20 startups, beginning this August. Merrick Furst (Computer Science) is helping to lead the effort.

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Merrick Furst (Computer Science) is helping to lead Georgia Tech's implementation of new programs that will provide both education and resources to campus innovators. 

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Georgia Tech and Merrick Furst (Computer Science) team up with angel investor Imlay Investments in order to attract tech entreprenerial talent to Atlanta and keep it there.

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Georgia Tech and the Wild Dolphin Project researchers are teaming up with dolphins in the hopes of co-creating a language both dolphins and humans can understand. 

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Researchers will begin learning and cataloging dolphin sounds this summer using Thad Starner's (Interactive Computing) software as part of the CHAT project.

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The purpose of the CHAT project co-created by Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) and Denise Herzing is to not only receive and translate into English noises from dolphins, but also emit noises so researchers can communicate back.

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Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) is analyzing recordings to find distinct clicks and whistles that represent core units of dolphin communication as part of the Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT) project. 

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Artificial intelligence researchers at Georgia Tech have teamed up with the Wild Dolphin Project to create a computer program that may allow researchers to communicate with dolphins.

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Developed by Beki Grinter and Ph.D. candidate Marshini Chetty (Interactive Computing), Kermit is an easy-to-use application that allows users to monitor and control network usage within their home environment. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy, a social learning network, is one of a new group of OpenCourseWare resources allowing web 2.0-style interaction and engagement with material.

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As part of an ongoing effort to foster innovation and entrepreneurship within its campus community, the Georgia Institute of Technology has announced the creation of three new programs that will complement several well-established initiatives. Merrick Furst (Computer Science) to co-direct program for early-stage startups. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing) used 3d modeling lighting techniques from the 80's as inspiration for his app Trimensional.

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Georgia Tech's Thad Starner (Interactive Computing) comments on how gesture interfaces can be useful. 

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Georgia Tech has been nominated for the Auggies live demonstration at the 2011 Augmented Reality Event. 

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Georgia Tech researcher Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing) combines cutting edge app technology and 3D modeling to create Trimensional. 

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Georgia Tech's Amy Bruckman (Interactive Computing) talks about how digital technologies encourage creation and collaboration at the Sandbox Summit.

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Students comment on Vijay Vazirani's (Computer Science) unique teaching style, which Vazirani attributes to his father.

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Nearly three dozen students, faculty and staff picked up awards from the College of Computing on April 26 in a ceremony that marked two full decades of Awards Celebrations for the College—and the first for Dean Zvi Galil. Source: Office of Communications

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Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) discusses Simon and how he can not only request your attention, but also recognizes when he has it. (Video story) 

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Jeffrey Vetter (CompSci & Eng) and his team working on The Kneeland Project at Georgia Tech are reaching out to their colleagues at Tokyo Tech by providing cycles and storage that will be essential to continuing their research this summer.

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy now has medals, achievements and fans to help distinguish and encourage active users. 

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Grant Schindler's (Interactive Computing) iPhone app Trimensional allows you to turn your face into a 3D computer model. 

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The new pro upgrade in Grant Schindler’s (Interactive Computing) Trimensional allows users to email a file that can be opened with any 3D program to themselves.

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Trimensional, the iPhone 4 app created by Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing), creates a 3D image of your face using projected light from four different directions.

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Georgia Tech's Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing) comments on how students are using the web as the modern day classroom. 

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Trimensional, the iPhone app created by Georgia Tech researcher, Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing), can now not only scan a 3D model of you face, but also send that image to a 3D printer, allowing you to have a physical copy within about 30 minutes. 

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Grant Schindler's (Interactive Computing) iPhone application Trimensional gives consumers the ability to create 3D models of their face with their phone.

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) offers his expertise on the data breach and quick tips for safeguarding yourself. 

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy answers every student's question 'Who can I ask for help?' when it comes to studying.

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Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing) demonstrates how his smartphone app Trimensional works. (Video Story)

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Grant Schindler (Interactive Computing) has created an iPhone app that uses four different lighting conditions to create a full 3-D model of an object.

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Vijay Vazirani (Computer Science) has received a 2011 Guggenheim Fellowship for research into algorithmic problems in economics and game theory. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech's Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing) comments on how you know you've got what it takes to be an entrepreneur. 

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Helene Brashear, a recent Computer Science Ph. D. Alumna, comments on what her and other researchers at Tin Min Labs are working on to improve the software used to read Sign Language using the Kinect.

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Georgia Tech's Chris Sprague (Computer Science) talks about how OpenStudy aligns with the Gates Foundations' goal of "making topflight education accessible to the masses by leveraging technology." 

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) comments on why stolen email addresses can be dangerous, and warns people to not let their guard down. (Video Story)

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science), of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center, offers his expertise on the Epsilon data breach and what users and custodians can do to protect their data. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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After four years the Algorithms & Randomness Center (ARC) and ThinkTank will have a new director, as Prasad Tetali (CS) takes over for founding director Santosh Vempala (CS), effective April 1. Source: Office of Communications

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Mark Guzdial (Interactive Computing) and Barbara Ericson (College of Computing) won the Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award from the Association for Computing Machinery for their work on Georgia Computes!. 

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Georgia Tech's Nick Feamster (Computer Science) discusses why people who have received an email warning that their email address may be compromised should be on high alert for scams. (Video Story)

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Gregory Abowd (Interactive Computing) is working on bringing better awareness and understanding to autism in our area. 

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Georgia Tech's Nick Feamster (Computer Science) discusses why people who have received an email warning that their email address may be compromised should be on high alert for scams. (Video Story) Source: CNN

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) comments on why cyber crime is very bad for business. 

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Mark Guzdial and Barbara Ericson, the husband-and-wife pair who together are reinvigorating computing education for a generation of Georgia students, have received the ACM’s 2011 Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award, the organization announced today. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech's Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) demonstrates and explains the two types of robots that were sent to Japan to help with the nuclear crisis. (Video Story) 

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) says Facebook's decision to shut down a fan page devoted to accused cop killer Jamie Hood raises difficult questions concerning the role of a private company in muffling public conversation (video). Source: Fox 5 Atlanta

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Nearly as long as we’ve had electronics, musical inventors have tried to imagine new electronic instruments. The Guthman Competition, founded by Gil Weinberg (Interactive Computing), rewards genuinely novel approaches. Source: Create Digital Music

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You can benchmark the cycles of your CPU, power of your GPU, speed of your Internet connection and a myriad of other seemingly important things. However, there's one missing benchmark that could make all those seem rather frivolous: the openness of your connection. Source: Engadget

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Google has awarded Georgia Tech $1 million to study and develop tools to help people detect if their Internet access is being slowed down—or blocked—by a service provider or even the government. Source: Creative Loafing

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With some 60 countries worldwide censoring online content, Georgia Tech will use a $1 million grant from Google to develop tools that will promote Internet transparency. Nick Feamster and Wenke Lee (Computer Science) are principal investigators. Source: AJC.com

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In the wake of Internet blackouts in Egypt and Libya, Google has announced it is awarding at least $1 million to Georgia Tech researchers working on tools that will immediately reveal when governments are trying to shut down or censor use of the Internet. Source: Network World

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) suggests that unmanned aerial vehicles be used to collect images from potentially dangerous sites in Japan following the March 10 earthquake. "I am very surprised they have not used this option," he says. "UAVs could be used to generate information from close range without risking lives." Source: IEEE Spectrum

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Google has awarded $1 million to a project led by Nick Feamster and Wenke Lee (Computer Science) so that they can develop simple tools to detect Internet throttling, government censorship and other "transparency" problems. Source: Ars Technica

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A team of Georgia Tech researchers will use a $1 million Google award to provide Internet users around the world with tools to measure their Internet Service Providers' performance, as well as detect whether their data is being tampered with. Source: Office of Communications

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Aaron Bobick (Interactive Computing) discusses how Simon can detect whether or not he has got a human's attention 80% of the time using visual cameras. 

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy is named as one of the ten most innovative companies in education for its mission to make the world one large study group.

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Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) talks with CNN anchor Ali Velshi about search & rescue robots being deployed in Japan in the earthquake and tsunami aftermath. Source: CNN

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At the 6th annual ACM/IEEE Conference on Human-Robot Interaction Georgia Tech researchers showcase their latest research on bringing robots and humans a little closer together. 

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Cody, a robotic nurse at Georgia Tech, touches people in exactly the same way, but people react differently to this touch depending on whether they perceived the touch as comforting or something done to clean their arm.

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Georgia Tech researchers are teaching Simon how to recognize when people are paying attention to him. Understanding this social interaction can help Simon mimic how humans interact with each other.

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Georgia Tech researchers working with Cody, a robotic nurse, feel that successfully integrating robots into healthcare will require managing human interpretation of the intentions of the robot. 

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Tamer Shaaban (Computer Science) discusses what made him create a video about the Egyptian revolution that would touch millions. (video story) 

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Researchers at the School of Interactive Computing are teaching Simon how to act more human-like in both his motions and his ability to grab your attention (and know whether or not he has your attention). 

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Georgia Tech researchers’ tested how people respond to a robot’s touch and found that generally people’s reactions differ based on the robot's intent. 

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Ellen Zegura (Computer Science) has been elected to a three-year term on the Computing Research Association Board of Directors, the association announced. Source: Office of Communications

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Aaron Bobick (Interactive Computing) comments on how he and other Georgia Tech researchers are giving Simon the ability to know whether or not humans are paying attention to him. This ability will allow Simon to more naturally engage with human beings. 

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Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) and other researchers at Georgia Tech are creating algorithms in order to teach their robot Simon a new kind of language- body language. (Video Story)

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Is an open-source standard the best way to go in popularizing augmented reality mobile browsers? Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) and his KHARMA team think so.

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Betsy DiSalvo (Interactive Computing) discusses her project, Glitch, and the impact she is hoping to make in the African-American male culture. (Radio Story) 

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Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) and his team are working on an AR standard, KHARMA, which will be open-sourced in order to allow developers everywhere to create and test the future of AR applications. 

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A research group including Aaron Bobick and Andrea Thomaz (both Interactive Computing) has found that they can program a robot to understand when it gains a human’s attention and when it falls short. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) hopes that building robots to "meet people's social expectations" will make it easier for people to interact with them. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Augmented reality games have great educational potential for students, says Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing). "Computers are very patient," he says. "The computer can come up with problems all day, and it can check and say 'yay' over and over." Source: The Wall Street Journal

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Research by Melody Moore Jackson (Interactive Computing) into brain activity shows that some science fiction-inspired explanations for these mysterious stones near Elberton, Ga., may not be so outlandish after all (video download). Source: History Channel

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Three College of Computing faculty members have been honored by Georgia Tech for their outstanding work. Ashwin Ram was awarded the 2011 Class of 1934 Outstanding Innovative Use of Education Technology, and Barbara Ericson and Mark Guzdial jointly received the 2011 Faculty Outstanding Service Award. Source: Office of Communications

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The College of Computing has begun concurrent searches for the next chairs of the schools of Computer Science and Interactive Computing. Professors Henrik Christensen and Dana Randall will chair the search committees for CS and IC, respectively. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech graduate Bill Murdock discusses how 'Jeopardy' was just the beginning for Watson and how artificial intelligence could assist humans in the future. 

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On April 26-27, the Center for Robotics & Intelligent Machines (RIM) will teach four short courses, open to anyone who wants to enroll and covering a range of topics in robotics. Source: Office of Communications

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Simon, the kinder, gentler robot "with a face that's easy to love," is just one of the social robots featured on NOVA's March 24 episode of "What's the Next Big Thing?" Creator Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) explains the intention behind Simon's cute features (video). Source: PBS.org

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The Georgia Tech development team releases a developer preview version of Argon, an augmented reality browser, in the Apple App Store.

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Yale is the latest university to announce it is enhancing the learning experience for users of its online course offerings by letting them collaborate via OpenStudy, the "Match.com for online learners" co-founded by Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing). Source: Yale Daily Bulletin

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Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) puts augmented reality in the palm of your hand with Argon, the first mobile AR browser based on open Web standards.  Argon is available now for free download to the iPhone at Apple’s App Store. Source: GT Communications & Marketing

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Count Georgia Tech computing undergraduates Ajai Karthikeyan, Jason Tilley and Kenneth Stuart as three students impressed by the performance of IBM's Watson on the game show Jeopardy!--and thinking hard about Big Blue as a potential employer. Source: FINS Technology

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What would Sherlock Holmes have thought about Watson, IBM's Jeopardy! champion computer? Watson programmer (and Ph.D. alumnus in computer science) Bill Murdock admits the human brain is still one pretty impressive machine. Source: AJC.com

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Can video games help bridge the "achievement gap" facing young African American males? "Glitch Game Testers" creator Betsy DiSalvo (Interactive Computing) thinks so. "Game consoles often are the most powerful computational devices and the only Internet-enabled devices in our participants’ homes," she says. Source: DML Central

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Georgia Tech alumnus Bill Murdock comes back to campus to discuss his role as one of the builders of IBM's Watson. 

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Created by Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) and her team at the Georgia Tech Socially Intelligent Machines Lab, Simon, the learning robot, is listed as one of the top ten robots to watch. 

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Assistant Professor Chris Peikert (Computer Science) has been named a 2011 Sloan Research Fellows, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation announced on Feb. 15. Source: Office of Communications

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Ph.D. student Craig Tashman took first prize in Georgia Tech’s 2011 Research & Innovation Conference (GTRIC), held Feb. 8 in the Student Center. Source: Office of Communications

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Henrik Christensen, KUKA Chair of Robotics in the Georgia Tech College of Computing’s School of Interactive Computing, has been selected to receive the 2011 Engelberger Robotics Award for Education, considered the world’s top honor in the field of robotics, for his leadership in the international robotics industry. Source: Office of Communications

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Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) and his team are leading the way in creating a browser and architecture for augmented reality so that its use in the everyday lives of both companies and consumers becomes the new standard. (Video story)

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GeorgiaTech's Ronald Arkin (IC) is quoted on his belief that a robot would be a more ethical and humane choice to send into a battle zone than a person. 

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Professor David Bader (CompSci & Eng) received the IEEE Computer Society’s Golden Core Member award during the IEEE Computer Society’s Executive Board Meeting in Long Beach, Calif., Feb. 2. Source: Office of Communications

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To support the strategic plan’s focus on faculty-led, interdisciplinary and transformative research, Executive Vice President for Research Steve Cross has announced the launch of the Institute for People and Technology (IPaT). Professor Beth Mynatt (Interactive Computing) will serve as executive director. Source: Georgia Tech Communications & Marketing

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Assistant professors Chris Peikert and Hyesoon Kim of the School of Computer Science are the latest two College of Computing faculty members to earn NSF CAREER Awards. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech's Nick Feamster (CS) comments on the Egyptian government shutting off the internet, and discusses the future role of the internet in the political arena. Video Story.

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Consumers soon might be able to use their iPhones to pay for transactions via credit card. But is it safe? "Until this technology is analyzed in a public way by experts in security and wireless protocols, I think we don't know how secure this is yet," says Jon Giffin (Computer Science). Source: ABC News.com

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At a World Economic Forum panel discussion this week, Gil Weinberg (Interactive Computing) shows off Shimon, his robotic musician creation. "The robot can play classical or jazz or whatever. It will push music forward," says Weinberg. Source: Reuters

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Gil Weinberg, director of Georgia Tech's Center for Music Technology, will demonstrate a live performance of his robotic musician that can improvise with human musicians at the 2011 Pulse: Art and Technology Festival.

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Georgia Tech's OpenStudy is inspiring other schools to create similar online social academic sites such as Purdue's Mixable to encourage collaborative studying. 

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Robots in the workforce are becoming a real possibility due to developments in artificial intelligence. The algorithm of deception developed by Ronald Arkin (Interactive Computing) and his colleagues at Georgia Tech is among the technology noted. 

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Professors Ali Adibi and Elizabeth Mynatt (Interactive Computing) have been selected by the Georgia Cancer Coalition to be among the 12 award recipients of the 2011 Cancer Research Awards. Source: Georgia Tech Communications & Marketing

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The new Center for 21st Century Universities, directed by Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), will serve as a living laboratory for testing “disruptive technologies” in education such as social networking and online learning. Source: Campus Technology

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Georgia Tech Provost Rafael Bras has appointed Aaron Bobick (Interactive Computing) and Merrick Furst (Computer Science) as two of 10 Institute faculty to the International Advisory Group, an internal committee that will help chart the course for Tech’s overseas partnerships. Source: Global Atlanta

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The world’s biggest military is rapidly remaking itself into a fighting force consisting largely of machines. Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing) says robotic soldiers could be programmed to act more humanely than their human counterparts. Source: Popular Science

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OpenStudy, the online collaborative learning service co-founded by Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing), has partnered with Open Yale and New York University’s Open Education program to supplement their online open courses. Source: HackEducation.com

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Are your 140-character musings completely useless or totally worth reading? Ph.D. student Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing) has helped create Who Gives a Tweet?, a service that allows your Twitter audience to rate your offerings. Source: CNN.com

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Wikipedia is here to stay—so says the Association for Psychological Science’s (APS) Wikipedia Initiative, which is encouraging psychologists to help improve the world’s fifth most-popular website by editing its articles. Amy Bruckman (Interactive Computing) helped get the APS project off the ground. Source: PsychologicalScience.org

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Education technology has become a busy space in recent years, and collaborative learning services like OpenStudy, co-founded by Ashwin Ram (Interactive Computing), can make the campus community a global experience. Source: Mashable.com

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Six Georgia Tech faculty members, including Mary Jean Harrold and Ellen Zegura (both Computer Science), have been elevated to Fellow status by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Source: Georgia Tech Communications & Marketing

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Do people with autism think in pictures? Ashok Goel (Interactive Computing) and Ph.D. student Maithilee Kunda say the available evidence does seem to support Temple Grandin's idea about how she and other individuals with autism process information. Source: Autism Community

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At the Humanoid Robotics Lab, Mike Stilman and Magnus Egerstedt (both Interactive Computing) give robots human (and super-human) capabilities. Golem Krang, one of the world’s strongest robots, lifts a 40kg payload. Puppet Magnus applies puppetry skills to robotics. Source: ZDNet

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GeekTech’s robotic highlights of last year included Simon, from Andrea Thomaz’s (Interactive Computing) Socially Intelligent Machines lab. Simon learns new skills simply by interacting with people, proving that anyone can teach a robot certain tasks without programming. Source: Network World, PCWorld

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The complete wild strawberry genome, newly sequenced by a research team led by Mark Borodovsky (CompSci & Eng), could enable a biologically improved berry with better flavor and more antioxidants. Source: CNN

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