Professor Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) and his team reviewed biological research results from squirrels showing how they gather acorns and store them in specific locations. Source: Forbes

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“There are quite vigorous debates about whether quantum computers will ever actually be built,” said Chris Peikert (Comp Sci). “But that’s a separate question from whether quantum techniques or quantum algorithms can help you solve problems in new ways.” Source: Scientific American

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“What does it mean to be a quality university in this age of explosive innovation?” asked Richard DeMillo, director of Georgia Tech’s Center for 21st Center Universities. “Colleges can’t convince themselves that things will be the same in five years.” Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

 

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To Shimon's creator, robotocist and musician Gil Weinberg (Interactive Comp), the robot is a way of creating new kinds of music we'd never hear otherwise. Source: Wired

 

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Ian Bogost (Interactive Comp) says the increasing use of games is little more than a fad promoted by marketing hucksters. Source: The New York Times

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ATLANTA – Dec. 12, 2012 – For the second straight year, the College of Computing's  Holiday Gift Guide decks the halls with some of the more inspired, ambitious and definitely digital “gifts” ever placed under the virtual tree. Source: Office of Communications

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In a 2007 study, researchers from Georgia Tech's College of Computing looked at the ways in which Roomba owners bonded with their gadgets. Source: Yahoo! News

 

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None of the leading mobile browsers have security that's up to snuff, according to researchers at Georgia Tech. "We found vulnerabilities in all 10 of the mobile browsers we tested, which together account for more than 90% of the mobile browsers in use [in the U.S.]," Patrick Traynor (Comp Sci). Source: Mashable

 

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Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) and his grad students programmed a similar strategy into some wheeled robots, and the tactic worked--the decepticon deceiving robot lured a “predator” to false locations. This could have great practical value in military situations, the researchers say. Source: Popular Science

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ATLANTA – Dec. 5, 2012 – How unsafe are mobile browsers? Unsafe enough that even cyber-security experts are unable to detect when their smartphone browsers have landed on potentially dangerous websites, according to a recent Georgia Tech study. Source: Office of Communications

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Using deceptive behavioral patterns of squirrels and birds, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed robots that are able to deceive each other. The research is funded by the Office of Naval Research and is led by Professor Ronald Arkin, who suggests the applications could be implemented by the military in the future. The research is highlighted in the November/December 2012 edition of IEEE Intelligent Systems.

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Georgia Tech has been selected by DARPA to perform research in the area of scalable analytics and data-processing technology. The Georgia Tech team will focus on producing novel machine-learning approaches capable of analyzing very large-scale data. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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A research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology has received a $2.7 million award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop technology intended to help address the challenges of "big data" – data sets that are both massive and complex.

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The Georgia Tech Information Security Center predicts that in 2013 the big hit of 2012 - the Cloud - will turn against us. Or rather, botnets will learn how to take advantage. Source: Huffington Post

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In late October, Tucker Balch began teaching Georgia Tech’s first free class on Coursera to more than 40,000 students, ranging from retirees to high schoolers, around the world. Source: Institute Communications & Marketing

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Georgia Tech alumna Joy Buolamwini has been named a Rhodes scholar. She will attend the University of Oxford, where she plans to pursue degrees in African studies and global governance and diplomacy.

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Every cloud may have a silver lining the saying goes, but there will likely be no such silver lining for the future of cloud computing, which tops the list of serious computer security threats for 2013. Source: RedOrbit

 

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Georgia Tech and UMass Amherst share $6.24 Million NSF grant for broadening U.S. computer science education.

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Georgia Tech, along with partner research organizations on the Keeneland Project, announced today that the project has completed installation and acceptance of the Keeneland Full Scale System (KFS). Source: HPC Wire

 

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Georgia Tech researchers, in a cyberthreat forecast for 2013, warn new and increasingly sophisticated means to capture and exploit user data will be seen. "Every year, security researchers and experts see new evolutions in cyber threats to people, businesses and governments," said Wenke Lee (Computer Science). Source: UPI

 

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ATLANTA – Nov. 14, 2012 – Georgia Tech, along with partner research organizations on the Keeneland Project, including the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, the National Institute for Computational Sciences and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, announced today that the project has completed installation and acceptance of the Keeneland Full Scale System (KFS). Source: Office of Communications

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Noted academic and game designer Ian Bogost (Interactive Comp) created a satirical Facebook game named Cow Clicker, for instance, whose purpose was to satirise the dull stupidity of many early social games. Source: TechCrunch

 

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A glove developed by Tanya Markow (Interactive Comp) can teach people to play the piano and help those with spinal cord injuries regain sensation in their hands. Source: CNN

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With a $150,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Georgia Institute of Technology will develop three massive open online courses (MOOCs) targeted at those who have yet to pursue or complete a college degree.

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Sitting in front of a camera and giving a lecture to students you can’t see is intimidating. This is just one of the things that Tucker Balch has learned about the process of teaching a massive open online course (or MOOC) through Coursera.

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ATLANTA – Nov. 12, 2012 – Georgia Tech has received $561,130 for the first phase of a negotiated three-phase $2.9 million cooperative agreement contract from the U.S. Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency (DARPA) to create the algorithmic framework for supercomputing systems that require much less energy than traditional high-speed machines. Source: Office of Communications

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Sitting in front of a camera and giving a lecture to students you can’t see is intimidating. This is just one of the things that Tucker Balch has learned about the process of teaching a massive open online course (or MOOC) through Coursera.

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Richard A. DeMillo (Comp Sci), director of the Center for 21st Century Universities, talks to The Washington Post about Georgia Tech's involvement with Coursera. Source: The Washington Post

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According to a study by Eric Gilbert (Interactive Comp), even though negative gossip was 2.7 times more likely to appear in an employee's inbox, all gossip was an important exchange of social information. Source: Huffington Post

 

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Georgia Tech is joining a revolution in higher education by offering online courses to anyone anywhere for free. "It's hard to imagine a better way to affect more people, to influence their thinking on a subject," said Professor Tucker Balch (Interactive Comp), who's the first at Tech to videotape his lectures, then post them online. Source: 11 Alive

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"It's hard to imagine a better way to affect more people, to influence their thinking on a subject," said Professor Tucker Balch (Interactive Comp), who's the first at Georgia Tech to videotape his lectures, then post them online. Source: The Examiner

 

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Simply by looking at these different rates of word usage, Schnoebelen and his colleagues, David Bamman of Carnegie Mellon University and Jacob Eisenstein (Interactive Comp) of Georgia Tech, can predict the gender of an author on Twitter with 88 percent accuracy. Source: The Boston Globe

 

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Girls are less likely to play video games, hence less likely to tinker with the inner workings of computers at a young age, says Barbara Ericson, who heads the Georgia Institute of Technology's efforts to get more young girls interested in computer science. Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

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A new study of how slang expressions spread on Twitter could offer insights into a more general question in linguistics: how language changes and evolves. Jacob Eisenstein (Interactive Computing) and colleagues used statistical analysis techniques to work out how “Metropolitan Statistical Areas” (MSAs) influence each other. Source: BBC News


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By mimicking how primates visualise an unfamiliar environment - a process called mental rotation - researchers are building a new kind of guidance system for robots. Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) is leading the effort to incorporate this technique into software for controlling robots. Source: New Scientist

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A research team led by Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp), a rock star in robotics, says its "MacGyver" robot can use the everyday objects it comes across to accomplish high-level tasks. A new promotional video for the school shows the potential for this robot and other next-generation bots. Source: Fox News

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Ian Bogost (Interactive Comp) demonstrates an astonishingly intuitive visual interface which enables a journalist with zero programming skill to turn any news story into a plethora of different custom-designed games in seconds. Source: Innovation Investment Journal

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For the millions of Americans who live with paralysis, mentally controlling artificial limbs and mobility devices would be a big step forward toward more independent living. Melody Moore Jackson (Interactive Comp) is trying to make that happen. Source: CNN

 

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Researchers, led by Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Comp) recently revealed that they are developing a tool that allows adults to test themselves for dementia in the comfort of their own home. Source: Gizmag

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Forbes named the College of Computing at Georgia Tech one of the top ten colleges for your bank account with the average starting salary for graduates being $60,387. Source: Forbes

 

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Groundbreaking research by Gregory Abowd (Interactive Comp) could be paving the way for the early detection of autism. Researchers are using special gaze-tracking glasses to measure eye contact in children, a lack of which is often a tell-tale sign of autism. Source: WSB TV

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Digits is a "really nice piece of work", says Thad Starner (Interactive Comp), who is also technical lead on Google's Project Glass. Digits is in its early stages, says Starner, who has been using a wearable computer for almost 20 years. Source: New Scientist

 

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Researchers, led by Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Comp) recently revealed that they are developing a tool that allows adults to test themselves for dementia in the comfort of their own home. Source: RedOrbit

 

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Led by Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp), the team at Georgia Tech will use a three-year $900,000 grant from the Office of Naval Research to develop a bot that uses a custom algorithm to scan a room for random objects, size up their usefulness and functions, and then use it to accomplish a more complex task. Source: Gizmodo

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Currently, robots aren’t yet quick thinkers on their feet. Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp) wants to change that. He’s working on robots that can identify random objects in their environments and use them as tools to accomplish high-level tasks. Source: NBC News

 

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Mike Stilman (Interactive Comp), who studies robot navigation among movable obstacles, is studying the cognitive processes that enable humans to grab arbitrary objects and find creative new uses for them. Source: Popular Science

 

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Georgia Tech researchers, led by Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Comp), have developed ClockMe, a home test for adults to screen themselves for early signs of dementia. Source: UPI

 

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Gaming won’t be the only use of Digits, though. It could feasibly replace the mouse entirely. “You can imagine using really subtle gestures [with Digits],” said Thad Starner (Interactive Comp), “I’d use it in class to pull up notes while I’m teaching.” Source: Digital Trends

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A Georgia Tech research team has received a grant from the Office of Naval Research to work on a project that intends to teach robots how to use objects in their environment to accomplish high-level tasks.

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Of emails sent by corporate workers, about 15 percent contain gossip. The trend spans all ranks of organizations, with the lowest level employees playing a major part in circulating it according to findings from doctoral student Tanushree Mitra and Eric Gilbert (Interactive Comp). Source: NewsOK.com

 

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Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Comp) has created a tool that allows people to screen themselves for early signs of dementia. The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test, one of the most commonly used screening exams for cognitive impairment. Source: Psych Central

 

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Intel recently announced that Vishal Gupta, a PhD student of Karsten Schwan (Comp Sci), and Aparna Chandramowlishwaran, a PhD student of Rich Vuduc (Comp Sci & Engineering), are recipients of 2012 Intel Fellowships.

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Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) believes that drones will soon be able to kill enemies on their own independently. Arkin added that robotic weapons should be designed as “ethical” warriors and that these type of robots could wage war in a more “humane” way. Source: CBS Local

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With baby boomers approaching the age of 65 and new cases of Alzheimer’s disease expected to increase by 50 percent by the year 2030, Georgia Tech researchers have created a tool that allows adults to screen themselves for early signs of dementia. The home-based computer software is patterned after the paper-and-pencil Clock Drawing Test, one of health care’s most commonly used screening exams for cognitive impairment.

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Ronald Arkin (Interactive Comp) believes that countries will inevitably deploy independent robots capable of killing an enemy without a human pushing a button. Source: AFP

 

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Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp), using Simon the robot as her student, is redefining how robots and humans interact. She sees a future where any “naive user” (or nonprogrammer) could buy a robot, take it home, and instruct it to do almost anything. Source: Popular Science

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Researchers in Georgia Tech’s Center for Behavior Imaging have developed two new technological tools that automatically measure relevant behaviors of children, and promise to have significant impact on the understanding of behavioral disorders such as autism.

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To build the underwater communications devices, marine biologist Denise Herzing partnered with the Wearable Computing Lab at Georgia Tech run by Thad Starner (Interactive Comp). “To really prove the value of the algorithm, we hope to use it to help Denise learn something new about dolphin vocalization,” Starner says. Source: Outside Magazine

 

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In collaboration with the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC), Damballa announced the discovery of a new iteration of TDSS/TDL4 malware that is utilizing domain generation algorithm (DGA)-based communication for command-and-control (C&C). Source: MarketWatch

 

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Atlanta Web security firm Damballa Inc. has raised $15 million — capital it will use to fuel an expansion in Europe and Asia. Paul Royal (Comp Sci) talks about the Georgia Tech spinoff that has developed technology that sniffs out dangerous software. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Popular Science has named Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp) one of 2012’s “Brilliant 10,” an award given by the publication to ten scientists under 40 whose innovations will change the world. Source: Office of Communications

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A small group of scholars is grappling with what could be the next generation of weaponry: lethal autonomous robots. At the center of the debate is Ronald C. Arkin (Interactive Comp) who has hypothesized lethal weapons systems that are ethically superior to human soldiers on the battlefield. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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Georgia Tech has developed a new algorithm that quickly determines betweenness centrality for streaming graphs. “Unlike existing algorithms, our system doesn’t restart the computational process from scratch each time a new edge is inserted into a graph,” said David Bader (Comp Sci & Eng). Source: HPCwire

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Stinger (Spatio-Temporal Interaction Networks and Graphs Extensible Representation) is a graph-processing engine that project lead David Bader (Comp Sci & Eng) says is bigger, faster, and more flexible than anything currently in use for analyzing social media connections. Source: Businessweek

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Georgia Tech has developed a new algorithm that quickly determines betweenness centrality for streaming graphs. The algorithm can identify influencers as information changes within a network. The first-of-its-kind streaming tool was presented this week by Computational Science and Engineering Ph.D. candidate Oded Green at the Social Computing Conference in Amsterdam.

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Students learn faster when learning from robots that make mistakes. Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp) comments on a new study by Japanese researchers. Source: TechCrunch

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Perplexed robots make better teachers. "Anything that gets a person more actively engaged and motivated is going to be beneficial to the learning process," says Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Comp). "So needing to teach the robot is a great way of doing that." Source: The Atlantic

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Flashpoint Director and Developer, Merrick Furst (Comp Sci) will travel to Israel to assist startups participating in Microsoft’s accelerator, while accelerator participants will spend a month in Georgia, and Flashpoint startups travelling over to Israel. Source: The Next Web

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Students consider the schools on this list as the most technologically advanced in the U.S.  The College of Computing is a pioneer in the “new face of computing” establishing a more diversified engineering discipline. Source: Mashable

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James Rehg (Interactive Comp) and other researchers have released a study on the possible application of machine learning technology, burrowed from computer science, to areas of biology that use microscopic examination of model genetic organisms. Source: Phys.org

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Georgia Tech has named Gregory Abowd of the College of Computing and Marie Thursby of the Scheller College of Business Regents' Professors.

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Barbara Ericson, Director of Computing Outreach for the Institute for Computing Education (ICE), has been named the winner of the 2012 A. Richard Newton Educator Award. This award recognizes teaching practices, techniques or innovative and new education approaches that attract girls and women to math, computing and engineering. Source: Anita Borg Institute

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Cedric Stallworth, assistant dean of Georgia Tech’s College of Computing discusses the challenges of attracting women to the STEM fields and the importance of educating them about the opportunities in computing. “There is a lack of understanding of the breadth of the computing field; it touches everything in our lives,” he said. Source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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Professors Wenke Lee and Keith Edwards have been named directors of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) and the GVU Center, respectively, College of Computing Dean Zvi Galil announced Aug. 1. Source: Office of Communications

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Computer-generated characters have become so lifelike in appearance and movement that the line separating reality is almost imperceptible at times. But while bipeds and quadrupeds have reigned supreme in CG animation, attempts to create and control their skeleton-free cousins using similar techniques has proved time-consuming and laborious.

Georgia Tech researchers have found a possible solution to this challenge by developing a way to simulate and control movement of computer-generated characters without a skeletal structure, anything from starfish and earthworms to an elephant’s trunk or the human tongue.

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Charlie Kemp (Interactive Comp) and his team are working to build robots that help the disabled with everyday tasks; a stroke victim is already successfully using one of the robots in his home. Source: CBS News

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Researchers have developed an electronic glove that can teach you to play the piano. Dr. Tanya Markow (Interactive Comp) helped create the glove. Source: Marketplace

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Georgia Tech is one of a dozen major research universities that has signed an agreement with Coursera to put their web-based courses online. The Director of the Center for 21st Century Universities, Rich A. DeMillo (Comp Sci), discusses the potential for this major experiment in education. Source: The New York Times

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Music can affect the way we feel--this shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone, but the Mobile Music Touch (MMT) device created by a group of Georgia Tech researchers, led by Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp) both surprises and delights. Source: PCWorld

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A wireless musical glove developed by Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp) not only teaches users to play songs on the piano, but may also improve the sensation and mobility of the hands of people who have suffered spinal cord injuries. Source: CNET

 

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A new wireless glove that can teach piano lessons could help people with spinal cord injuries regain some motor control, according to Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp). Source: Popular Science

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Georgia Tech Researchers, led by Tonya Markow (Interactive Comp) have developed a wireless glove that is designed to improve mobility and sensation in people with spinal cord injuries. Source: Forbes

 

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Thad Starner (Interactive Comp), a technical lead at Google, said his initial motivation for developing a wearable computer was that he wanted to be a better student: "I decided to make a system that would let me take notes while I was also paying attention in class, and better retain things." Source: The Boston Globe

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The Georgia Institute of Technology has signed an agreement with Coursera to put their web-based courses online and create new opportunities for hands-on learning in the classroom.

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Researchers at Georgia Tech and Atlanta's Shepherd Center have created a wireless, musical glove that may improve sensation and motor skills for people with spinal cord injuries (SCI). The gadget, Mobile Music Touch, was successfully used by individuals with tetraplegia who suffered their injury more than year before the study, a time frame when most rehab patients see very little improvement for the remainder of their lives.

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High school students are learning computer code through the composition of hip hop tracks at the Earsketch workshop, one of several summer camps organized by the Institute for Computing Education, overseen by Barbara Ericson, Director of Computing Outreach in the College of Computing. Source: USA Today

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Georgia Tech is welcoming 18 metro Atlanta high school students to campus this week, hosting a musical summer camp that is intended to have broad implications for the future of computer science education. The teenagers are creating and remixing hip-hop beats using a software program called Earsketch. Although only 5 of the students had ever written computer code before they arrived at the camp, each high schooler will create a three-minute, computerized tune by Friday.

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Georgia Tech researchers are working to develop innovative technologies to detect and diagnose Alzheimer's Disease at an earlier stage. ClockReader, developed by Ellen Yin-Luen Do (Interactive Computing), is one such tool. Source: Aging Well

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Greg Turk (Interactive Computing) received the 2012 Computer Graphics Achievement Award for his contributions to physically-inspired mathematical application in graphics and Karen Liu (Interactive Computing) received the 2012 Significant New Researcher award for her pioneering contributions in the field of computer animation. Source: ACM SIGGRAPH

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A team of surgeons and university researchers recently reported promising results from a novel surgical connection intended to streamline blood flow between the heart and lungs of infants born with just one functional ventricle, or pumping chamber, instead of the normal two.

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Gil Weinberg (Interactive Computing) has developed a one-foot-tall (30 cm) smartphone-enabled robot called Shimi, whichi can recommend songs, dance to the beat and play tunes based on listener feedback. Source: Gizmag

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Supercomputing performance is getting a new measurement with the Graph500. The latest benchmark “highlights the importance of new systems that can find the proverbial needle in the haystack of data,” said David Bader (CompSci & Eng). Source: Sandia National Laboratories

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David A. Bader (Computer Science) discusses Google's latest project where scientists created the largest neural networks for maching learning by connecting 16,000 computer processors, which they turned loose on the Interneted to learn on its own. Source: The New York Times

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"Instagram has created a strong social networking site that focuses strictly on the art of photo sharing and visual engagement," says Michaelane Dye, PR and Social Media Officer at Georgia Tech's College of Computing. "It's really about taking a photo and allowing it to become an object of value to other individuals."

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A study by Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) examined hundreds of thousands of messages and found that about 15 percent of the essentially amounted to gossip - emails in which the sender and recipient discussed thrid parties in ways that had no business impact. Source: CBS News

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An interview with Thad Starner (Interactive Computing), a technical lead for Project Glass, who is one of the world's leading experts on what it's like to live a cyborg's life. He has been wearing various kinds of augmented-reality goggles full time since the early 1990s. Source: Technology Review

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Georgia Institute of Technology was recognized as one the 50 charter members of the HPC500, an exclusive community of High-Performance Computing user organizations at the vanguard of their areas of specialization, during the International Supercomputing conference, ISC'12, in Hamburg, Germany, June 17-21.

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Zvi Galil, John P. Imlay Jr. Dean of Computing at Georgia Tech, was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Waterloo at the mathematics portion of its 104th Convocation ceremony, held Friday, June 15. Source: Office of Communications

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A new study from Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) picks apart these emails to learn about how gossip is used and spread within a company. Source: The Atlantic

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"The Sonification Lab receives a lot of requests to convert scientific data into sound, but this one was truly unique," Bruce Walker (Interactive Computing). "It’s not often that we have a chance to help an actual star compose music." Source: MSNBC

 

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Microsoft is "revolutionizing the world," said Juan Llanes (Computer Science student), who is also interning in Redmond, Washington this summer. Llanes grew up revering Microsoft during his childhood in Cuba, where computers were effectively banned. Source: Fox Business

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The IEEE Computer Society will honor 14 prominent technologists at its annual awards dinner in Seattle, including Mark Guzdial and Ling Liu (both Computer Science). Source: Seattle Post Intelligencer

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Over the years, researchers in Georgia Tech’s Sonification Lab (SonLab) have converted numerical data into sounds to analyze stock market prices, election results and weather data. When the reggae/rock band Echo Movement called wanting to turn the movements of celestial bodies into music, SonLab looked to the heavens.

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Georgia Tech helped start the trend toward more corporate input into curricula in 2002, when the university hired Richard DeMillo (Computer Science), Hewlett-Packard Co.chief technology officer, as its dean of the College of Computing. Source: Bloomberg

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Gossip heard through the office grapevine may actually benefit organizations more than it hurts them, new research by Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) has found. Source: Fox Business

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ATLANTA – June 6, 2012 – According to some estimates, the average corporate email user sends 112 emails every day. About one out of every seven of those messages, says a new study from Assistant Professor Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing), can be called gossip. Source: Office of Communications

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Nick Feamster (Computer Science) discovered that Twitter propagandists retweet without adding much original commentary, retweet others' content fairly quickly and coordinate with others to send duplicate or near-duplicate tweets on the same topic at the same time. Source: Huffington Post

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Now we know that people who tweet about the same things constantly, or retweet without any original thoughts, don't just suck — they might also be trying to spread biased information on Twitter, as revealed in a new study by Nick Feamster (Computer Science). Source: BuzzFeed

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Decision-making by robots seems likely to increase. This might be a good thing, says Ronald Arkin (Computer Science) who is developing “ethics software” for armed robots. Source: The Economist

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A new study out of the Georgia Tech School of Computer Science identifies four characteristic behaviors of Twitter "hyperadvocates," whose actions clearly separate them from the tweeting behavior of typical users. Source: Office of Communications

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Colleges, universities, and museums across the country are bucking the camp traditions of campfires and crafts, in favor of robotics, gaming, and mobile app development. Enrolling your teen in intro-level sessions gives them an opportunity to realize their aptitude in areas they hadn't otherwise considered says Barbara Ericson (Institute of Computing Education). Source: U.S. News & World Report

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Since 2006, Ronald Arkin (Computer Science) has been working to develop robot drones that are capable not only of carrying out pinpoint attacks but of deciding on their own when it is permissible to fire on a particular target. Source: Wall Street Journal

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The controversy surrounding a drastic restructuring of the University of Florida's CS department is still unresolved. The CS students have continued receiving support, including an e-mail to University of Florida president  from Zvi Galil, dean of the College of Computing. Source: Communications of the ACM

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Michael Best (Interactive Computing) said his lab was receiving an average of 50 messages per second through social media during the 2011 general elections in Nigeria, adding that his laboratory worked with some civil so­ciety groups to monitor the election. Source: Business Day

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Marshini Chetty (Interactive Computing) conducted a study that shows negative user experiences associated with bandwidth caps. However, Chetty believes the pressure put on Internet users could be relieved with the right data usage monitoring tools. Source: Daily Tech

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Professor Charles Isbell (Interactive Computing) has been appointed the senior associate dean of the College of Computing, with responsibility for managing much of the College's day-to-day operations, Dean Zvi Galil has announced. Source: Office of Communications

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ATLANTA – May 7, 2012 – A new study by a Georgia Tech researcher shows that capped broadband pricing triggers uneasy user experiences that could be mitigated by better tools to monitor data usage through their home networks. Source: Office of Communications

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A young developer has found a genius way to get Apple‘s attention: figure out how to make the iPad better for users and then get users to sell the idea to Apple. In one fell swoop undergrad student Daniel Hooperdemonstrates his chops with both technology and marketing. Source: Forbes

 

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Approximately 2,500 undergraduate and graduate students will celebrate the Georgia Institute of Technology’s 242nd commencement at the Georgia Dome. Dr. Charles Vest, President, National Academy of Engineering, and President Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will address the doctoral and master’s ceremony at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 4, while Governor Nathan Deal will address the undergraduate ceremony at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 5.

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At long last, someone gets some ironclad credit for breaking the news of bin Laden's death. A study conducted by Ph.D. candidate Mengdie Hu (Interactive Computing) claims victory for Keith Urbahn, aide to former Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld, as the first person to break the news. Source: Washington Times

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Mengdie Hu (Interactive Computing) has studied how reliable Twitter was as a news source using the Bin Laden killing as a test case. To find out, researchers examined 400,000 tweets sent in a two-hour period starting just minutes before Urbahn's infamous tweet. Source: Marketplace Tech Report

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In this article by Richard DeMillo (Computer Science), he discusses how investment in IT doesn't matter if colleges are just going to keep conducting business as usual. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

 

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Researchers are studying the explosion of social media activity as a way of gauging "certainty" in an age of Internet news. A team led by Mengdie Hu (Interactive Computing) wanted to distinguish rumor or "uncertain" tweets made that night from those that were "certain" regarding bin Laden's death. Source: MSNBC

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How do we separate fact from rumor on Twitter, and how do we decide which Tweeters to trust? That question is at the heart of a study conducted by Mengdie Hu and John Stasko (Interactive Computing). Source: Los Angeles Times

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A study conducted by Ph.D. candidate Mengdie Hu (Interactive Computing) explains how Twitter broke and spread the news of bin Laden's death. The study may be the most comprehensive yet in showing how news spreads on Twitter. Source: ReadWriteWeb

 

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By analyzing 600,000 tweets sent on the night U.S. Special Forces captured Osama bin Laden, researchers studied how Twitter broke the story and spread the news. Their data also shows that the Twitterverse was overwhelmingly convinced the news of bin Laden’s death was true, even before it was confirmed on television.

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Two Georgia Tech College of Computing professors – Mark Guzdial and Ling Liu – received honors from the IEEE Computer Society for their contributions to the field of computer science. Source: Office of Communications

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When Things Fall Apart, an experimental campaign developed by Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing), deconstructs and reconstructs your Twitter avatar when you donate to the Red Cross. Using a visual language called Processing, your picture will be scattered and periodically rebuilt over 60 hours in 12-hour increments. Source: ABC News

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Changing your Twitter pic is kind of like slapping a political bumper sticker on your car; it never started or finished a revolution. But Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) has come up with a clever way to add impact to what’s been labeled social media “slacktivism.” Source: Wall Street Journal

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Nick Feamster (Comp Sci) has developed Project Lithium, software designed for a home router that can be controlled via a web interface. With it, a consumer or carrier can set parameters for how traffic behaves on the home network. Source: GigaOm

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When Things Fall Apart is a social media app that deconstructs a user's avatar and rebuilds it over three days. Developed by Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing), the app is available to anyone who donates $10 to the Red Cross and thematically mirrors the organization's work in rebuilding communities that have been shattered to pieces by natural disasters. Source: Mashable

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The Center for 21st Century Universities' TechBurst competition announced its winners this week, capping the first iteration of an experiment in peer-to-peer instruction. “This is meant to be a start of a thread of conversations among students," says center director Rich DeMillo (CS). Source: Wired

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When it comes to home networks, consumers are often like small children, demanding what they want when they want it, while ISPs are left to play the role of parent. But Nick Feamster's (CS) project using OpenFlow protocols has the potential to change that dynamic. Source: GigaOM

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To manage a $1.7 budget deficit, the University of Florida's engineering dean is proposing to make changes that likely will end all research in the school's computer science department and turn it into a teaching-only unit. That, says a UF Ph.D. student, runs counter to what "far-sighted" universities like Georgia Tech have done. Source: Huffington Post

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Parents who post photos of their children on social media sites are not just sharing details of their own lives--they're painting the first strokes of the "digital persona" that their kids will have their entire lives, says Michaelanne Dye, who has a master's degree in cyberanthropology and manages the College of Computing's social media channels. Source: ReadWriteWeb

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Instead of ignoring the inevitability of change, how can institutions incorporate disruptive technologies within the traditional university? That is the question that the Center for 21st Century Universities (C21U) sought to answer with its first annual TechBurst Competition. Source: Office of Communications

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There can be a very thin line between fantasy and science. Fantasy drives science. Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) agreed: “Is it augmented reality, or is it location-based notifications? It’s going to generate ideas in people and expectations that just might not match.” Source: Wired

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Georgia Tech's College of Computing has received a $500,000 grant from Jim Allchin, considered the “father” of Microsoft Windows. Allchin is a Georgia Tech alumnus. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Computer science Ph.D. students Shauvik Roy Choudhary, Shuang Hao and Chengwei Wang are three of 30 students nationwide awarded the 2012 Yahoo! Key Scientific Challenges Program award. Source: Office of Communications

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ATLANTA – April 13, 2012 – James E. (“Jim”) Allchin – a recognized visionary in the computing industry and notable Georgia Tech alumnus – and his wife, Catherine M. Allchin, have committed $500,000 to the Georgia Tech College of Computing for the continued intellectual and professional development of rising faculty superstars. Source: Office of Communications

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The Georgia Institute of Technology opened its doors to more than 400 middle school and high school students on Wednesday for the third annual Robotics Open House.

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Google claims that their new glasses can add additional detail and context about all the details of a person's everyday life. Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) says, “In one fake video, Google has created a level of over-hype and over-expectation that their hardware cannot possibly live up to.” Source: PC Magazine

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Google's Project Glass eyewear caused quite a stir when the company unveiled it this week. But now augmented reality experts, including Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) have cast doubts on whether Google could pull off what's shown in the promo video with the hardware. Source: CNET

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When Google officially unveiled Project Glass we saw a provocative glimpse of the future. However, Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) believes Google may have set the bar too high for itself. Source: Wired

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Google has sparked an online tizzy with its Project Glass video but augmented reality experts such as Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing) are asking the obvious questions, such as “is it a good idea for Google to hype expectations about a product that it cannot possibly deliver?” Source: Christian Science Monitor

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The digital age is here to stay, so some colleges are updating mandatory general education courses. Each of the nearly 2,000 freshmen entering Georgia Institute of Technology each year must take a computer science course regardless of their major, says Charles Isbell (Comp Sci). Source: Chicago Tribune

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A recent U.S. News article points out a growing interest among colleges and universities to make basic computer science a required course for all students. Noting the importance of computer science for all majors, Georgia Tech has already done this. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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As we continue on a track where technology powers everything from our toothbrushes to our textbooks, should computer science be added to the list of general education requirements? Charles Isbell (Computer Science) says definitely. Source: U.S. News & World Report

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Maya Cakmak (Interactive Computing) is trying to help create an easy-to-use human-robot interaction. Along with other GT researchers, she has recently identified the types of questions a robot can ask to get more information from a human so that they can learn a new task. Source: Smart Planet

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As robots become increasingly intelligent, it’s not hard to imagine a future where they’re completely autonomous. In a recent paper, GT researchers, led by Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing), discuss how humans can make sure that robots don’t get out of line. Source: MSNBC

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The Center for Experimental Research in Computer Systems’ (CERCS) Karsten Schwan, Matt Wolf and Greg Eisenhauer (Computer Science) will lead Georgia Tech's involvement in the Department of Energy's $5M Scalable Data Management, Analysis and Visualization (SDAV) Institute, part of the Obama Administration's "Big Data Research and Development Initiative" launched on March 29, 2012.Source: U.S. Department of Energy

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Expensive, bureaucratic, and slow-moving, higher education is an industry ripe for technological disruption. Led by Richard DeMillo (Computer Science), Georgia Tech’s Center for 21st Century Universities is among the universities leading the way with education technology. Source: Forbes

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The Center for 21st Century Universities (C21U), led by Richard DeMillo (Computer Science), is a self-described living laboratory for fundamental change in higher education. Source: The Guardian

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ATLANTA – March 20, 2012 – Following a year-long national search, Georgia Tech’s College of Computing has hired renowned computing leaders Lance Fortnow and Annie Antón to chair its schools of Computer Science and Interactive Computing, respectively, effective July 1. Source: Office of Communications

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How can we make sure robots uphold moral standards? In a new paper by Ronald Arkin (Interactive Computing), he disccusses the need to address questions about ethical behaviour in autonomous robotic systems. Source: Irish Times

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A new study by Ph.D. student Maya Cakmak (Interactive Computing) has managed to identify the kind of questions that a robot is capable of asking when placed in an interactive, learning environment. This in turn will help it characterize a smooth and productive human-robot relationship. Source: Ubergizmo

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Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) and PhD student Maya Cakmak presented findings this week about how humans might best communicate with robots by talking to them as opposed to programming them. Source: Network World

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Richard A. DeMillo (Computer Science) and Paul M.A. Baker talk about challenges and opportunities facing colleges at a time of economic pain and technological change—among them the chance that many universities might follow Borders Bookstores into oblivion. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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ATLANTA – March 8, 2012 – A new study by Maya Cakmak and Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing) identifies the types of questions a robot can ask during a learning interaction that are most likely to characterize a smooth and productive human-robot relationship. Source: Office of Communications

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Georgia Tech is running an experimental MOOC, a free-floating forum that exists more in the online postings the students than in the formal materials assigned by professors. Next year, Richard DeMillo (Computer Science) hopes to put together a MOOSe, or massive open online seminar, through a network of universities that will offer credit. Source: New York Times

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Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) co-developed a BrailleTouch, which can help blind people to send text messages and compose emails on smartphones without the need for expensive extra equipment. Source: CNN en Español

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Researchers, led by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) have built an application that is vying to be a solution for texting without the need to look at the screen. The possibilities are many: hammer out an e-mail, text or tweet — all without taking your eyes off whatever you’re doing. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Just as people's voices betray hints of the region they originate from, so, it turns out, do phone calls. Mustaque Ahamad (Computer Science), cofounder of Pindrop, discusses how the security company can extract specific information from the line noise on a call. Source: Technology Review

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The Keeneland Workshop, headed by Jeff Vetter (Computational Science and Engineering), was the stage for new findings on OpenCL, a major programming framework for GPU computing. Source: HPCwire

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Richard DeMillo (Computer Science) has been nominated as a technology innovator for his use of 'living laboratories' to drive innovation. Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

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The National Modeling and Simulation Coalition held its Inaugural Congress on Feb. 6 in Washington D.C. Richard Fujimoto (CompSci & Eng) is on the interim Board of Directors and interim chair of the Education and Professional Development Committee. Source: GT IDH

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The co-inventer of a braille keyboard for smartphones, Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) demonstrates his invention. Source: CNN

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Alexander Gray (Computational Science and Engineering) discusses SkyTree, the big data startup that has set out to democratize the science of machine learning. Source: Gigaom

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In a standing-room-only lecture on Feb. 23 at Georgia Tech, Dan Shechtman told the story of his 1982 discovery of quasi-periodic crystals, which resulted—30 years and many scientific battles later—in his being awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Source: Office of Communications

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A new technology developed by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) makes touchscreens more accessible to the estimated 22 million American adults with vision loss by adapting the same system used to type Braille. Source: Mashable

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Nancy Nersessian (Interactive Computing) talks about her project that's been running since 2001 to investigate how bioengineering scientists think and work, and how to pass their skills on to students. Source: Science Magazine

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BrailleTouch, an app designed by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing), incorporates the Braille writing system into a touch-screen device . It essentially turns an iPhone ‘s touch screen into a soft-touch keyboard programmed for Braille, thus requiring only six keys. Source: Wall Street Journal

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Here to texters' rescue is Braille Touch, a new app developed by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing), that enables people to type messages on an Android or iOS touch screen without having to look down. Source: LA Times

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If Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) has his way, we'll all be learning Braille soon. He developed BrailleTouch, an app that could help blind people type on smartphones without the need for expensive equipment. Source: CNN

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Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) talks about how certain words used in emails can reveal if the message is being sent by someone higher up or further below you on the corporate food chain. Source: NPR

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Designed for the visually impaired, an open-source app out of Georgia Tech, developed by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing), could prove to be a texting tool for the masses. Source: CNET

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Early studies with people proficient in Braille writing show that typing on BrailleTouch (created by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing)) is six times faster than other eyes-free texting solutions. Source: Engadget

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While Siri and VoiceOver can assist visually impaired iPhone users, new software developed by Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) looks to supplement these accessibility options. Source: GigaOm

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Taking advantage of gestures and multitouch interaction, Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) has created an app that allows users to type on a smartphone without looking at the screen. Source: Ars Technica

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How can you track one ant amongst a horde of them? Andrew Quitmeyer, a Georgia Tech PhD student working with Jim Rehg and Tucker Balch (Interactive Computing) shows us how with a canister of CO2 gas, a stereoscope and very small paintbrush. Source: Scientific American

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In addition to looking great on a résumé, coding introduces students to a new style of thinking, says Charles Isbell (Interactive Computing). It goes beyond coding—it's computational thinking. Source: U.S. News & World Report

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ATLANTA - Feb. 17, 2012 - Georgia Tech researchers have built a prototype app for touch-screen mobile devices that is vying to be a complete solution for texting without the need to look at a mobile gadget’s screen. Source: Office of Communications

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Mario Romero (Interactive Computing) demonstrates his program BrailleTouch, technology that helps the visually impaired better use cell phones. Source: 11 Alive's Atlanta and Company

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Eric Gilbert (Interactive Computing) examined some half a million Enron emails to shed light on which words are used most frequently in messages going up and down the corporate hierarchy. Source: Computerworld

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ATLANTA – Feb. 14, 2012 – A new study by Georgia Tech’s Eric Gilbert shows that certain words and phrases are reliable indicators of whether workplace emails are sent to someone higher or lower in the corporate hierarchy. Source: Office of Communications

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Five College of Computing students won poster session awards at the 2012 Georgia Tech Research & Innovation Conference (GTRIC) on Tuesday, Feb. 7.

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The robotics industry is in a major growth mode but companies are having trouble finding high quality employees.  Henrik Christensen (Interactive Computing) discusses what individuals need to break into the booming robotics field. Source: Today's Engineer

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Google has launched a new program devoted to fostering discussions among leaders in the science and technology industries. Blair McIntyre (Interactive Computing) discusses the new project, “Solve for X,” and the issues faced by programs like it. Source: Tech News World

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What would happen if robots were a part of your everyday life at school and beyond? Henrik Christen (Interactive Computing) takes that projection a step further when he argues, “If we make conscious robots, they would want to have rights and they probably should.” Source: Forbes

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Did you know that Twitter is full of inane, boring tweets that nobody wants to read? It’s true, according to research conducted by Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing). Source: TIME

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Twitter has been celebrated for its ubiquity and impact on world events from natural disaster recovery to political uprisings. But researchers, including Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing), found that useful postings are few and far between. Source: Computerworld UK

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A lot can be said in 140 characters but, according to new research, conducted by Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing) a quarter of people aren't paying attention to most of it. Source: Fox Business

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While some of your tweets might be of utmost importance to you, most people could not care less, according to a study from Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing) and researchers at MIT and Carnegie Mellon. Source: PC Magazine

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Account holders admit only a third of the tweets they receive are of any interest, the rest are either actively disliked or forgotten almost immediately. They particular hate too many hashtags, being told where someone is every time they go out and lots of moaning and complaining, the study, by Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing) and other researchers, found. Source: The Telegraph

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Two Georgia Tech students were recently named by Forbes as top 30 influencers under the age of 30. Digital Media grad student Chris DeLeon was honored in entertainment. Human-Centered Computing Ph.D. candidate Eugene Medynskiy was tabbed in technology.

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Richard DeMillo (Computer Science) was featured at Authors@Google discussing themes from his new book, Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities. Source: Google

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Kurt Luther (Interactive Computing), in collaboration with researchers from Carnegie Mellon and MIT, conducted a data-driven study that examined 43,000 responses to Tweets in order to find precisely what people like - and loathe - about microblog posts. Source: The Atlantic

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With people at the root of new online security problems, it's nearly inevitable that a company with which you do business is capable of being hacked. Mustaque Ahamad (Computer Science) discusses how you can protect yourself from financial damage even if your information is hacked. Source: Main Street

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Richard DeMillo (Computer Science) discusses his new book, Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities, in this on-air radio interview. Source: LA Talk Radio

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Flashpoint's San Francisco gathering on Thursday offered a window into how ambitious techies’ visions become reality. Director Merrick Furst (Computer Science) says the program functions “to address uncertainties and risks in the startup phase.” Source: Mashable

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Richard DeMillo (Computer Science) comments on MIT’s decision to grant credentials to online students and the potential impact it could have on higher education. Source: New American

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Has the Internet made us greener? A study by Vytautas Valancius (Computer Science) says splitting data centers into a dispersed network might save energy in other ways. Source: The Kansas City Star

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After years of existing only in fiction, robots are now beginning to find a place in real-world.  Andrea Thomaz (Interactive Computing), along with two other robotics pioneers, discusses how her findings are shaping the future of robotics. Source: The Kavli Foundation

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Russell J. Clark (Computer Science) is working on a project to enhance situational awareness for first responders. His work combines projects in building sensors and instrumentation with novel user interfaces such as mobile augmented reality. Source: Forbes

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HPCwire has selected David Bader (CompSci & Eng) as one of their ‘People to Watch’ for 2012, a list comprised of an elite group of community leaders. A lead scientist in the DARPA Ubiquitous High Performance Computing (UHPC) program, his research is supported through highly competitive research awards. Source: HPCwire

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A startup company based on technology developed at Georgia Tech offers a solution to the growing challenge of telephone security, and is quickly gaining traction from investors, financial services companies and the security industry

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Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing) believes robot soldiers could be programmed to behave more ethically than soldiers in live combat, but a far easier task would be designing drones that behave themselves better than celebrity-chasing photographers. Source: The Guardian

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A flotilla of 15 startups from Atlanta presented their ideas in New York on Jan. 18 as part of the Flashpoint accelerator program's first series of demo days. Flashpoint Director Merrick Furst (Computer Science) says the program helps entrepreneurs develop their concepts beyond their startup phase. Source: Xconomy.com

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If robots one day are to relieve us of such household chores as laundry or doing the dishes, they must be engineered to be as safe and reliable as refrigerators, says Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing). Source: Economic Times

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Ellen Yi-Luen Do (Interactive Computing) says advanced eye-tracking technology could provide new ways to communicate for people with diseases or disabilities that severely hamper their ability to speak or write, like scientist Stephen Hawking. Source: TechNewsWorld

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A project directed by James Rehg (Interactive Computing) on automating insect behavior calls for tagging individual members of an ant colony. Ph.D. student Andy Quitmeyer put together an entertaining video on how best to accomplish this delicate task. Source: io9.com

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Flashpoint, Georgia Tech's startup accelerator program, had its first Demo Day on Jan. 10. The newly launched incubator, directed by Merrick Furst (Computer Science), is especially interested in investing in early-stage startups in the technology, medical device and biotech industries. Source: TechCrunch

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Rich DeMillo (Computer Science) says prospective students and their parents need to go beyond the organized campus tour when shopping for colleges: Talk to students and teachers, don't be fooled by fancy dorms or high-profile sports teams, and even check out schools' financial health before laying down that deposit. Source: Forbes.com

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Pindrop, an information security startup dedicated to phone security founded by Vijay Balasubramaniyan and Mustaque Ahamad (Computer Science), has drawn the interest--and the financial support--of the venture capitalist firm Andreesen Horowitz (subscription required). Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Is the Internet running out of real estate? A paper co-written by David Dagon (Computer Science) explains how the Web's domain-name service relies on a dwindling number of IP addresses to assign "space" in the virtual world. Source: New Legal Review

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Software that lets users know which companies are tracking their online habits is taking off. "Many privacy-conscious people take issue with someone tracking their online activities without their consent," says Mustaque Ahamad (Computer Science), director of the GT Information Security Center. Source: AJC.com

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Can "bounded reality" enable autonomous robot soldiers to act more ethically than humans while caught up in the fog of war? Ron Arkin (Interactive Computing) believes the answer is yes (video story). Source: Al Jazeera English

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Augmented reality--and the universe of applications it makes possible--is transitioning from the research lab to the real world, says Blair MacIntyre (Interactive Computing). What AR needs, he says, is a lot of talented developers to keep pushing it forward (video story). Source: BBC News

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"The real power of computer science is a new kind of literacy," says Mark Guzdial (Interactive Computing). "When we learn to program, we gain yet another way to understand the world and talk about it." Guzdial's Georgia Computes! program has been teaching that literacy to Georgia K-12 teachers and students for five years. Source: NBC News

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For all their software smarts, robots remain clumsy at manipulating real-world objects. By making robots not only strategize chess moves but actually move the pieces, says competition organizer Mike Stilman (Interactive Computing), new perspective could be gained on the machines' physical limitations. Source: New Scientist

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