David Bader Elected to Serve on Advisory Board for Internet2

July 26, 2007

College of Computing Associate Professor and Executive Director of High-Performance Computing David A. Bader has been elected to the 2007 Internet2 Advisory Council in its first-ever election held this summer. Formed in 1996, Internet2 is a non-profit consortium contributing to the advancement of networking research with projects like the Abiline Network and the National Lambda Rail (NLR) project, which has deployed the highest bandwidth research network in the country.

The election for Advisory Council members closed on June 28, with 57% of eligible member institutions from industry and research casting ballots. Bader, who was nominated by members of the Governance and Nominations Committee, will sit on the Research Advisory Council (RAC) of Internet2 along with two other researchers from MIT and Carnegie Mellon.

The RAC is responsible for advising the Internet2 Board (consisting primarily of university presidents and CIOs, as well as leaders from industry and research) on matters relating to Internet2's support for research, both network-focused research and disciplinary research that makes use of the network as a tool. The RAC provides a forum for strategic questions about how best to support the development of resources for scientific, humanities, clinical, computational, and other research communities domestically and internationally. The RAC will also provide advice on the nature and extent of research undertaken by Internet2 staff.

Internet2 is a not-for-profit advanced networking consortium comprising more than 200 U.S. universities in cooperation with 70 leading corporations, 45 government agencies, laboratories and other institutions of higher learning as well as over 50 international partner organizations. Beyond just providing network capacity, Internet2 and its members actively engage in the development of important new technology including middleware, security, network research and performance measurement capabilities which are critical to the progress of the Internet.

For more information and the complete announcement, visit the Internet2 website.