CS 4365/8803-IEC
Introduction to Enterprise Computing

Spring 2010

 


Instructor: Calton Pu ( mailto:calton@cc.gatech.edu
Office: KACB 3334
Office hours: By Appointment. 

First TA: Qinyi Wu (qxw@cc)
Office hours: By Appointment.


Classes: Tu/Th, 1:35 – 2:55pm
Class room : KACB 1456

UPDATE: This web page is unofficial. Please use T-square for official information on the course.

 


Description | Assignment | Announcement | Tentative Course Schedule | Grading | Projects | Additional Links

Description

CS 4365/6365/8803-IEC Introduction to Enterprise Computing

This course studies the impact of information technology on enterprises, with emphasis on both theoretical foundations and practical examples.

  1. Elements of enterprise computing. Three-tier client/server systems. Large scale Internet services and web electronic commerce systems.
  2. Core technologies for enterprise computing. Transaction processing techniques. Serializability, concurrency control, crash recovery. Online transaction processing (OLTP) monitors. Distributed database management systems, practical examples. Application servers, practical examples. Event processing, workflow, and other large scale systems.
  3. Case studies of enterprise transformation due to new information technology: mission-critical transaction processing, Internet and electronic commerce, data mining and decision support, etc.
  4. New research topics and technologies of potential impact: security, trust, privacy, micropayments, etc.


The course material consists primarily of papers and lectures/discussions led by instructor(s).  There will be a self-proposed project that applies the concepts and techniques discussed in the class to electronic commerce scenarios.  The comments and grade on project proposal will serve as the midterm feedback.  


Assignment

Commentary requirement
There is no specific format for the commentary as long as you cover the main points, limitation and relate the paper to your personal knowledge and other topics. One possible format is
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Commentary
Paper: Name of the paper
First paragraph: summarize the main points of the paper;
Second paragraph: point out the limitation of the paper;
Third paragraph: Relate this paper to your personal knowledge or related topics.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The commentary should fit into one page.

Date

Lecturer

Topic

Assigned Readings

1/12

Calton

Introduction to course

None

1/14

Calton

Giant Scale Services

Lessons from Giant-Scale Services

1/19

Calton

Elba Project

DB server comparison study; Cloud management study

1/21

Calton

Denial of Information Project

Evolutionary analyses papers.

1/26

Calton

Transactions: Serializability, CC

Chapter 2

1/28

Calton

Crash recovery

Chapter 6

2/2

Calton

2PC and Distribution

Chapter 7, OCP paper

2/4

Calton

OLTP monitors/RTF

A Practical and Modular Method to Implement Exended Transaction Models

2/9

Calton

TP tutorial

A Measure of TP – 20 Years Later (Gray)

2/11

Deepal

Web Service Tutorial

TBD

2/16

E.Melcher

Business Intelligence

TBD

2/18

Calton

Event processing

ConQuer and DEBS’09 survey paper

2/23

Students

Selected Project Proposal Presentations

Selected project proposals

2/25

Calton

Workflow tutorial

Artifact-based BPM papers

3/2

P. Joshi

Invited lecture

TBD

3/4

E. Marcial

IT for a financial application

TBD

3/9

Reserved

Invited lecture

TBD

3/11

Calton

Web service composition tutorial

Web Services QoS: External SLAs and Internal Policies Or: How do we deliver what we promise?

3/16

Calton

Application Server Tutorial

The Deployer's Problem: Configuring Application Servers for Performance and Reliability

3/18

Calton

Software as a Service

TBD

3/23

 

Spring Break!

 

3/25

 

Spring Break!

 

3/30

 

Open source (MySQL)

Strategic Sourcing with mySAP Supplier Relationship Management

4/1

Calton

Open source (JBoss)

JBoss

4/6

Calton

ERP: Cisco Case Study and Introduction to SAP/R3

ERP a Savior or Slayer of Enterprise Competitiveness

4/8

Calton

E-commerce Case Study

Towards Requirements-Driven Information Systems Engineering

4/13

Calton

E-commerce: digital payments

TBD

4/15

Calton

Reserved

 

4/20

Students

 

Project Presentations

 

(See T-Square for schedule)

4/22

Students

 

Project Presentations

 

(See T-Square for schedule)

4/27

Students

 

Project Presentations

 

(See T-Square for schedule)

4/29

Q. Wu

 

Collaborative applications

 

TBD

Grading (NEW for Sp’10)

The first component (20%) of the grades is the written commentaries. There will be an assignment for every lecture, but the students are expected to hand in commentaries for 50% of the assignments. Additional commentaries receive bonus points.

 

The second component (10%) is the project proposal, due on Feb 9. See T-square for details. 

 

The third component (20%) is the project presentation. Selected projects will be presented in the class during the last two weeks of lectures. Students who do not present in class will give a presentation in my office. This can be seen as an oral exam.

 

The main component (40%) consists of the project deliverables (see below).

 

The final component (10%) is new. There is an attendance requirement of 50% of classes to receive the full 10%. The project proposal and final presentations have mandatory attendance. Students who miss more than 50% of classes will receive negative grades in this component that will affect their overall grade.

 

 

Projects

The main deliverables of the course come from a self-proposed project.  Students (individually or teams of maximum 3) will design, propose, and implement a project relevant to the enterprise computing theme.  Typically, this will be the construction of some system component supporting enterprise computing (e.g., electronic commerce or supply chain) or an enterprise application.  Other ideas are certainly possible.  You are encouraged to discuss your ideas with the instructor and TA before proceeding to the proposal stage.  Examples of previous successful proposals have been posted on T-square. You may find examples that give you an idea of the format and length of typical project proposals.  Some ideas for projects follow.

  1. Mainstream EComm software.  (1.A) Download one of the application servers (e.g., WebLogic or Websphere) and use it to build an ecommerce service; run a simulated or real workload to evaluate its performance.  (1.B) Take an existing ecommerce service and implement it on a different platform (e.g., take a service based on Websphere and implement a subset on .NET), then compare their complexity and performance.  (1.C) Add support for wireless (e.g., cell phone) access to some ecommerce service.
  2. Research topics: (2.A) Evaluate the privacy guarantees given by various ecommerce sites and how they are implemented.  (2.B) Evaluate the strategies the large ecommerce sites are using to defend themselves against denial-of-service attacks. 

Exceptional projects may be expanded as research projects for additional credit.

Expected Project Deliverables

(1) Project Report: The report ties together your contributions and serves as a "map" or "root document" to guide us through the corpus of your group's work. Content: Your report should include the objectives of your project, the research problems you are addressing, the approach/methods you took for evaluation of your results, the architecture and functional components of your prototype system, three most interesting contributions of your project design and/or implementation. (Much of this can come from your proposal.) You are also expected to summarize

  1. what you have learned through the hand-on experience of doing this project, and
  2. what concepts and techniques you learned in class are used in the current project design,
  3. and (c) what concepts and techniques you learned in class can be considered for extension of your current project.

Format: I expect the report to be well written and documented with references. The presentation style and quality (syntax and grammar) are an important part of the evaluation and grading of your final project. As the length of the reports, there are no specific rules, and quality is more important than quantity. However, as a general guideline we'll be expecting report lengths of 5 to 10 pages.

 

(2) Project presentation slides. Both in-class and/or in-office presentations should have slides that summarize the project results.

 

(3) Program documentation, code, demo materials (input/output, video), web pages, pictures of actual systems built, any other material you want to include to get the maximum credit for the project.

Project Signup

Please use T-Square to sign up.